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Not charging Hyosung Motorcycle

Battery won't hold charge @

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  • Hyosung Master
  • 57,611 Answers

Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead-acid batteries.
1. Check battery terminals for damage or corrosion, check the battery cables at "BOTH" ends for loose, corroded, or broken connectors, "INSIDE" and outside the cable harness, perform connector wiggle test and check cables with an ohmmeter if necessary.
2. To check the regulator unplug it from the stator. Take a test light and clip it to the negative terminal of the battery and then touch first one pin and then the other on the plug that goes to the regulator. If you get even the slightest amount of light from the test light the regulator is toast.
To do this with a meter: black lead to battery ground, red lead to each pin on the plug, start with the voltage scale higher than 12vdc and move voltage scale down in steps for each pin. Any voltage is a bad regulator.
3. On the other part of the disconnected regulator plug. Set the multimeter for Ohms x1 scale and measure for resistance across the pins of the stator. You should read something around 0.1 to 0.2 ohms for a 32 amp system.
4. Then check for continuity between each pin on the plug and frame/engine ground. The meter needle should not move (infinite resistance)(digitals will show infinite resistance) if the meter needle does move (indicating continuity)(digitals will show some resistance), recheck very carefully. If the meter still shows continuity to ground the stator is shorted (bad).
5. Set the meter to read A/C volts higher than 30 volts (the scale setting for voltage should always be higher than the highest voltage you expect or you may fry the meter). Start the bike, and measure from one pin to the other on the plug (DO NOT cross the multimeter probes! - touch them to each other). You should read roughly 16-20 vac per 1,000 rpm.
6. If the battery was good under load test, if the stator is NOT shorted to ground, and the stator is putting out A/C voltage, then the regulator is bad (most likely even if passed step 2)
For more information about your question and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://korider.com/index.php?topic=25724.0
How to Fully Troubleshoot Your Motorcycles Charging System MotorcycleMD
https://www.manualslib.com/brand/hyosung
https://alpha-sports.com/hyosung_parts.htm
http://mybikemanuals.com/hyosung

Posted on Jun 22, 2019

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5 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya
  • 2 Answers

SOURCE:

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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ollie reece
  • 1167 Answers

SOURCE: KTM EXC 250F - Battery now holding its charge

is the battery charging by engine

Posted on Oct 08, 2009

  • 195 Answers

SOURCE: I've changed my battery just last November. I did

Well, if the Batt don't hold charge then check the regulator on the bike with an Ohmmeter you can buy one at an Auto parts shop....motor running you should see 14.5 V if not then the Reg is out!!!

Posted on May 24, 2011

  • 172 Answers

SOURCE: Battery won't hold a charge

If your battery will not hold a charge when it has been taken out of the bike and charged in a stand-alone setting, then one or more of the cells has become sulfated and has gone "dead." Also, as lead acid batteries age, each cell naturally loses the ability to hold its full charge, even if they're still providing the right voltage. I've found that motorcycle batteries are finicky--I've had brand name batteries fail after a single riding season, and I had one generic battery that lasted me for 4+ years of steady riding in summer heat and New England winter cold.

If your battery will hold a charge (and pass a battery load test, available for free at just about any auto parts store) when it is out of your bike but goes dead after it's installed in your bike, you have an open circuit in your bike that is draining the battery even after the key has been pulled from the ignition. One way to check for this problem is by going to the fuse box and pulling each fuse, one at a time, and using a multimeter to bridge the fuse terminals to see if current is present. Unless you have something like an electronic alarm and/or a clock built into your instrumentation, you should see no voltage across any of the fuse terminals. If you do see voltage, then it's time to start troubleshooting why this is occurring. The most likely places for a short circuit are in the ignition switch itself (an internal contact may have gotten distorted and thus provide power even when it shouldn't be) and, less likely, if the insulation has worn through in the hot lead off your battery or any of the wires that branch off that lead.

I would not be surprised if your battery has sulfated and simply needs to be replaced.

Posted on Jun 06, 2011

bogdanodwazn
  • 6059 Answers

SOURCE: honda 1998 cbr 900 rr battery won't hold charge

How old is battery everything has limit or alternator is weak.

Posted on Mar 17, 2013

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2005 Hyosung GV 250 Aquila not charging


Hi, Manny before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from the regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from the regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads for viewing or printing that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
2009 Hyosung GV250 Battery not charging Fixxit
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Hyosung Aquila 250 Service Manual
https://www.alpha-sports.com/Parts/H_GV250.htm
HYOSUNG GV250 User Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

Aug 16, 2017 | 2005 Hyosung GV 250 Aquila

2 Answers

Sony vaio vgn-nr285E battery won't hold a charge


If thelaptop battery is more than 3 - 4 years old then the battery could be worn out.Rechargeable batteries have a finite number of charge and discharge cycles andwill lose their charge capacity over time, i.e. won't charge to 100% andgradually the charge reduces until the battery won't charge up at all. OR Thebattery shows a 100% charge but when the adapter is disconnected the batterydrops off to zero capacity in a very short time. If the battery drops to anunacceptable charge level then the battery needs to be replaced.

Dec 03, 2011 | Sony VAIO VGN-NR285E/T Laptop

1 Answer

2005 Hyosung GT 650 R not charging


Hi, Gruntman before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage the battery is faulty and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Hyosung Gt650R battery not staying charged
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
HYOSUNG GT 650 Service Manual
HYOSUNG GT650 PARTS CATALOGUE Parts Catalog
HYOSUNG GT650 Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

May 19, 2017 | 2005 Hyosung GT 650 R

1 Answer

Wont turn over


First thing always is charge the battery. The top of the battery reads the proper amperage, and motorcycle stores will push their trickle chargers, or battery tenders, which won't actually charge it. Please make sure you disconnect the battery before you charge it.

Jul 09, 2011 | 2004 Aprilia Atlantic 500

1 Answer

Isn't starting. battery isn't getting a charge. bike starts once the battery is charged


Your battery MOST LIKELY has lost some of the battery cells, which will cause it to get a partial charge which will show it as a FULL charge when in fact it isn't getting a full charge. You should try taking it to get the battery tested and they can tell you if it needs to be replaced. I would guess they are going to replace it for you. A new battery should run around $90 for a motorcycle. Let me know if this helps you out. Jeff from fixya

Jun 11, 2011 | 2007 Hyosung GT650R TTC

2 Answers

I have a 2008 MS3 250 that will not charge


The battery may be dead and won't receive a charge. If you haven't already, try changing the battery, but charge the new battery on a battery charger before you put it in. You don't want the charging system to have to start off trying to charge another partially charged battery.

Feb 22, 2011 | 2005 Hyosung GT 650 R

1 Answer

How do you charge the battery?


Take your battery to your local auto parts dealer and they should charge for free..Though, assuming battery is low on acid, you will have to puchase battery acid and fill yourself prior to charge depending on whether you have a sealed battery or a refillable battery..The auto parts store should also let you know if its holding a charge..generally takes 24 hrs (trickle charge) depending on how they charge it. my car battery took 30 min. Refilled my hyosung battery with appropriate battery acid and turned out bad battery. I probably ruined by jumping it off while low on acid.

Aug 17, 2010 | 2005 Hyosung GT 250

2 Answers

I know how to use a multi meter but what is equivalent to an alternator on an Aquila 2002 hyosung cruiser. Where is the mechanism that charges the battery?


what is it that your wanting to do?? if your just checking your charging charging system set you meter to dc red to red black to bblack. you should read around 13.5- 14.5 when you rev the motor.

Mar 15, 2010 | 2002 Hyosung GV 250 Aquila

1 Answer

Starter solenoid is makeing a clicking noise,fitted a new one and its still makeing the same noise


That clicking noise is an indicator that the battery is not fully charged. If the battery will no longer take a charge it needs to be replaced. Motorcycle batteries normally last two years. How old is your battery?

Feb 22, 2010 | 2005 Hyosung GT 125

2 Answers

Battery died...How to charge


for motorcycles, 2 amp 12 volts max is recomended, usally the slow charge of a car charger

Jul 11, 2009 | 2005 Hyosung GT 250

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