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What types of wine are best suited for pairing with cheeses?

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The first step is to understand a little bit more about cheese. If you already know your wine well and want to learn a bit more about cheese will help you pair correctly then go through the Bulk Wine collection. Many people say that cheese pairs best with white wines. Such as Merlot can pair with gouda, gorgonzola, brie, Jarlsberg or parmesan, Syrah with cheddar, Chardonnay Pair well with brie, goat cheese, parmesan.

Posted on Jul 30, 2018

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Every wine can be used by very old cheese or dark choclat its simply a good combination especially truffle pecorino cheese with a good red Bulgarian melnik mavrud or a red Macedonian TIKVES wine ta ga zug is recommend.

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Posted on Apr 25, 2016

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White Wine & Red wine are the best suited pairing with cheese.

See more wine food pairing Top Wine Food Pairings

You can serve this to friends on coktail party & weekend party. Its amazing

Posted on Jun 01, 2015

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Wine and cheese seem to go together quite well. They are often paired together. I would always recommend pairing wines and cheeses that derive from the same region. It can be a very safe and usually successful way of pairing them together. Harder cheeses, such as rich cheddars, can be well paired with more tannic wines; while creamier cheeses, such as brie, are best paired with wines containing a higher level of acidity; and finally pair salty cheeses with sweet wines, for instance a blue cheese and a port.

Posted on Feb 03, 2013

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What does not go well with cheese


A broad question. Please send more info if you'd like - glad to help. I am posting regardless:

(from website:)
http://www.thekitchn.com/what-not-to-pair-cheese-pairin-148014)

What Not To Pair: Cheese Pairings to Avoid


(We) talk a lot about what makes a great pairing when it comes to cheese, wine, and food. And since cheese is so rarely-- really, too rarely, in our opinion-- enjoyed just entirely on its own, it's especially important to know what foods will heighten your experience of the cheeses you serve.

Equally vital is knowing what not to do. (Oranges and carrots, for example, are just a preview of two things that just won't make your cheese sing.) Here, some don'ts to keep in mind when putting together a cheese plate.

When pairing foods with cheese, your goal should be to highlight both elements equally. Ideally, go for flavors that will accentuate rather than overpower the cheese itself. Similarly, cheeses shouldn't overwhelm what you choose as accompaniments.
The exceptions to the rules below may be fresh cheeses, which act as excellent foils to stronger flavors. But generally speaking, the following things are examples of what to stay away from when constructing a cheese plate with a variety of different styles, ages, and flavors:

Spicy things: There may not be a worse way to kill the flavors of your cheese. While a searingly spicy hot pepper jelly is actually great with a cooling, sprightly puck of goat cheese (see above disclaimer regarding the fresh cheese exception), it wouldn't do anything for the subtle flavors of a semi-soft, natural rinded sheep milk cheese, for example. Veer from olive mixes speckled with dried red pepper flakes, really spicy pickled items, spicy meats, hot jellies, mustards, or chutneys, and even crackers with black peppercorns. While delicious, these accompaniments will linger on your palate and hinder your experience of the cheese in its natural state. Lightly spiced things can be great with cheese, liked sweet, spiced nuts and herbaceous olives. But beware of things that taste more of what was used for flavoring than of the food itself!

Garlic- or Onion-flavored Crackers and Bread: Unless you want to be left tasting the bits of dehydrated onion or garlic that so often sully the surface of breads and crackers, save these items for other moments. And beware of the "Everything" flavor, too, which may have lots of onion and garlic lurking within. Some cheeses, like stronger mountain cheeses and some funky natural rinded wheels, actually have subtle notes of spring garlic or onion. Breads and crackers infused with onion-y flavors can mar these compelling undertones, so beware.

Vegetables: Clearly this is a category that may be a bit too large to generalize, so to be more specific, stick with vegetables that have relatively mild flavors, like sliced fennel and endive spears. Slightly peppery greens like arugula or radicchio can be great compliments to cheese if you're thinking of making a cheese-laced salad. But on a cheese platter, stay away from the most vegetal of vegetables, like broccoli, carrots, green beans, celery, and cauliflower. While these all may make great additions to a crudite platter (and broccoli and cheddar soup is undeniably delicious), they seem straight-up strange to pair raw with nice cheeses.

Citrus or high-acid fruits: Orange segments, grapefruit, kiwi, and pineapple have their place, but not on a cheese plate. While so many different kinds of fruits go seamlessly with cheese-- like apples, pears, grapes, and figs, not to mention all of the dried fruit that compliments cheese so well-- those fruits that are higher in acid tend to turn cheese acrid. My mouth nearly cringes with the thought of the curdling effect these fruits would have on cheese!

Tannic Red Wines are similar to citrus in their ability to turn cheeses bitter. The lingering effect of tannin on cheese can be so negative, you may walk away with an inaccurate opinion of what you're tasting. You'll ruin not only your impression of the cheese, but of the wine, too!

- - - -

On a final note:
What do you call cheese that 'isn't yours'?

Give up?
"NACHO cheese"
:)


Jul 11, 2014 | Games

1 Answer

Can you refreeze cheese after power outage


Yes, as long as it has not been more than 24-48 hours or so.

Cheese is fairly tolerant of moderate temperature for a day or 2.

Apr 11, 2014 | Wine & Spirits

2 Answers

Tell me one of the best macaroni recipe.


I have no idea about macaroni recipes.But i think its good idea that you arrange macaroni food for your birthday party.I am suggesting you a link.Here have many idea about macaroni recipes.Try it Macaroni Recipe

Feb 07, 2014 | Melissa and Doug Melissa and Doug Wooden...

1 Answer

Can you refreeze cheese


Yes....if it has been no more than about 48 hours, and the cheese has been in the freezer. otherwise, 24 hours out of the freezer,

Jan 30, 2014 | Wine & Spirits

1 Answer

What kind of food should you put in a picnic basket?


You can take whatever foods you like but I would stick to about 4 dishes maximum or you will spend all your time opening up pots of food and clearing up. Here are my main staples that I always take on a picnic;

1. Bread (chunks of French bread or big loaves that you can tear from are very good)

2. Cheese (or take sliced cheeses or pieces of cheese and a sharp knife)

3. Fruit (this is a great option for summer picnics and goes really well with the cheese)

4. Wine (no picnic would be complete without a bottle of chilled wine).

Feb 27, 2013 | Home

3 Answers

What types of foods are best paired with Sparkling Wine?


Many people think that sparkling wines are best suited with sweet and decadent desserts. I go the other way, in fact, I find that the flavors are enhanced much more if paired with saltier foods. For specific pairing suggestions please visit the link below:

http://www.foodandwine.com/slideshows/champagne-pairings/1

Feb 03, 2013 | Wine & Spirits

1 Answer

What are the rules about pairing wine with food?


In my opinion, there are no rules. There are many popular suggestions; however I believe that the best pairing is one that you enjoy. So you do not have to stick with the notion of 'whites with fish and reds with meat' is you don't want to.

Feb 03, 2013 | Wine & Spirits

2 Answers

I have heard of food pairing with wine, but can I also pair foods with certain beers?


Pairing food with beer can add a dimension to your meal that can be very pleasing. I will attach a link that is worth reading. It provides some tips on how to properly pair certain dishes with particular beer styles successfully to bring out the best in each.

http://www.epicurious.com/articlesguides/drinking/beer/beerpairings

Feb 03, 2013 | Wine & Spirits

1 Answer

What is a wine picnic basket?


A wine picnic basket is just a cute idea. It looks like a picnic basket but is usually smaller and often comes with wine glasses and sometimes a cheese board and a cheese knife.

Jan 10, 2013 | Home

1 Answer

I have an avanti stockholm collection multi fondue set and I don't know what to use or how to heat up my chocolate, cheese etc?


Some hints.

Use methylated spirits of fuel for a spirit burner to keep the mix hot but heat it initially on a regular stove.

For chocolate, use the metal container in combination with the ceramic container to form a double boiler.

For cheese use the ceramic container on its own, taking care not to overheat, otherwise you get a singed bottom layer.

Swiss cheese fondue is something like this. Use Gruyere and Emmentaler in a ratio of about 1:4 (more Emmentaler). Some rub the inside of the pot with garlic before starting. Make a wine base by mixing a little wine with corn or potato starch, while waiting for the rest of the wine to heat to a simmer. Mix in the wine-starch mix to the hot wine, and cook until it thickens, then add the cheeses, and stir in well until they melt. Grate in nutmeg to taste, and add a splash of Kirsch (real Kirschwasser is not sweet: do not use an imitation or cherry liquer).

I don't have exact quantities so you will have to experiment. From memory, it goes something like this: about 200g Emmentaler, 50g Gruyere, 100ml wine, 10ml corn starch, 10ml Kirsch for around 6 people. I've seen recipes recommending more Grueyere but obviously that's not the real stuff because the geniune article is pretty strong, and more cheese per person. But I find in practice there's a limit to how much fondue most people can eat.

Dec 27, 2008 | Kitchen Ranges

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