Question about Janome Sewing Machines

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I have installed a Janome Walking foot on my Janome Skyline S5 and have the feed dogs up, but the foot does not touch the quilt sandwich or pull the sandwich through. What do I do?

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  • Janome Master
  • 12,731 Answers

You have the presser foot lowered? All I can think is you may have the wrong walking foot. It should be the same height as your regular presser feet.

Posted on Feb 01, 2018

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya

6ya staff

  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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SewExpress

Kim Fillmore

  • 41 Answers

SOURCE: fREE MOTION QUILTING

Hi Susan,

You're absolutely correct, you'll need to either drop the feed dogs (lever generally located near the bobbin case or on the outside base of machine) or cover the feed dogs with a plate (many machines have this included).

Then... you'll need to lower the presser foot - when you lower it, it should NOT touch the bed of the machine but sit slightly raised off the fabric surface. As you stitch the presser foot will lower onto the fabric to hold it taught as the needle penetrates.

Oddly enough it's easier to achieve smooth stitches when sewing at a faster speed, but begin by stitching fairly slowly until you get a feel for free-motion stitching. You'll be doing all the guiding and it may feel a bit strange and uncontrolled at first.

Position yourself at your machine so that when your hands on your fabric/bed of machine, your shoulders are relaxed (not all hunched up) and your elbows are slightly higher than the bed of the machine.

You'll want to stitch in a side-to-side or back and forth motion (as opposed to trying to turn the fabric.

Best of luck with this technique. Once you're comfortable with it, you're sure to enjoy the freedom of creating!

Happy sewing,
Kim & Linnette

Posted on Jul 31, 2008

Anonymous

  • 35 Answers

SOURCE: raising feed dogs

I've always been able to get a free PDF downloadable manual from Janome. They are happy to send you a manual for your specific machine via email, and they've always been very helpful to me. Here's a link to them:

http://www.janome.com/index.cfm/ContactUs/Machine_Support

Hope this helps!

Posted on Aug 16, 2008

kay54

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: stitches

Usually a walking foot is for straight forward stitching only.It keeps the many layers from shifting for you. The "hand-look" quilting takes a couple stitches forward then one back. If you look close, you will see about every other stitch is thicker and stands out more.

Posted on Sep 23, 2008

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Quilting on Janome MC 4000

I have a MC4000 and a manual. To raise or drop the feed dog, remove the accessory box and feel at the back of the free arm there is a lever that will slide left or right to raise or lower the feed dog. I am not a quilter, but the manual says to use foot A (zigzag foot) and accessory L (quilter) which appears to be a guide. Cheers, Deb, Townsville, Australia

Posted on Nov 03, 2008

RichSew

Douglas Plant

  • 222 Answers

SOURCE: Can't free motion quilt on Juki-T98QE

You need to be using a free motion foot or a darning foot, the regular presser foot is not for free motion.

Posted on Jun 03, 2010

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1 Answer

How to fix guiding arm to Janome DXL603 walking foot & what thickness cotton and needle are best? Top tension? Cotton fabrics & 2mm wadding used.


This is a tutorial for sewing 1/4" seam on a quilt sandwich but also shows how to install the walking foot:
http://www.janomespecials.com/mc11kse/video/even-feed-quarter-inch.html

As for tension, etc., you would test and adjust on a scrap sandwich made of the same material as your project. The top and bobbin threads should meet in the middle of the sandwich. Your machine also has an adjustable foot pressure. If you are sewing a thick sandwich you may need to lighten the pressure so the sandwich will feed easier through the machine.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=3&ved=0ahUKEwjwhPW03I3ZAhVE3GMKHQg0D9oQFgidATAC&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.strima.com%2Ftv%2FJanome-DXL603-QXL605-Strima.pdf&usg=AOvVaw2S97hWN8Ku6uliH260S9Qc


More tutorials
How to Videos Janome

Here's information about needles. For quilting sandwiches (with woven cotton, not knits), use a "brand new" sharp needle (like a universal, top-stitch, embroidery, or quilting needle) of the size large enough to accommodate the thread you are using and sturdy enough to be able to penetrate the sandwich without bending, probably at least an 80/12 or larger but not so large as to leave holes in the quilt.

https://www.schmetzneedles.com/all-about-needles/

Thread really depends on what you and your machine like to use. You can use cotton or polyester. Just be sure to use a good quality thread--nothing that has been setting in the drawer for 5 years or that was purchased from the bargain bin.

...

Feb 05, 2018 | Janome Sewing Machines

1 Answer

When quilting more than 2 fabrics, the feed dogs won't push the thicker fabric through. What else can I do?


So you are quilting but not free motion quilting... Generally, a walking foot is used when just doing straight stitch quilting. It has feet that actually walk at the same time the feed dogs are pulling.

Aug 03, 2017 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Janome 1600P DBX


You need to drop the feed dogs, install a darning or free motion quilting foot (make sure the presser foot is lowered). Because you will not be using the machine to move the fabric, the stitch length selection is of no importance. Make sure the stitch width is set to zero. You should test FMQ on a scrap quilt sandwich of the same makeup of your project, ie quilt fabric with batting sandwiched between. The upper tension should be set so that both threads meet in the middle of the quilt sandwich. Because it is FMQ, some extra adjustment may be needed.

Once the tension is where you want it, you can practice FMQ until you can move it smoothly in conjunction with the machine speed.

Practicing on a white board with erasable markers is a handy way to learn to move smoothly. The most difficult part of free motion quilting is learning to move the fabric smoothly. Do NOT lack for practice as that is the only way to improve. Those people who make it look simple have been doing it for years!

How to Free Motion Quilt on Regular Sewing Machine

Free Motion Quilting for Beginners Part 1 Video from Sewing with Nancy

Free Motion Quilting

Learn How to Free Motion Quilt Stippling

....

Oct 31, 2016 | Janome Sewing Machines

1 Answer

HV sapphire 930 not feeding properly


When stitching together a quilt sandwich, it is recommended to use a walking foot on your machine. The walking foot moves the upper fabric in conjunction with the feed dogs. Sometimes, if the quilt sandwich is not too thick, a roller foot can also help but may not be sufficient for a quilt sandwich.
What is Walking Foot Sewing Tips for Beginners
How To Use Walking Foot
How to Use Roller Foot

You may also check the presser foot pressure on your machine. This regulates the amount of pressure the presser foot applies to the fabric and the feed dogs. If the pressure is too strong, it will tend to push the upper layers of fabric, creating a bubble look. If the pressure is too loose, there is not enough pressure for the feed dogs to physically pull entire quilt sandwich under the presser foot.
(The pressure is adjustable depending on the types of fabric and thicknesses being sewn.)
http://www.sewdaily.com/how-to-sew/sewing-machine-basics/the-best-kept-secret-on-your-sewing-machine

http://makeitsew.biz/presser-foot-pressure

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Oct 01, 2016 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Problems with the walking foot on a janome skyline s5. Worked well for awhile. Now skipped stitches, puckering, length &width off.


The U shaped clamp usually hooks "around" the needle screw. Yes, usually the walking foot may need oil (just a tiny bit) where the parts move against each other.

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Dec 25, 2015 | Janome Sewing Machines

2 Answers

Which foot do I use for quilting


a quilting foot or buy one with a round hole in it great

Mar 09, 2015 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

I love free motion sewing but I have two totally different sets of instructions! One says use a walker foot, one says no foot! Please tell me every setting/foot. I am breaking alot of needles and getting a...


Ok, I hope I can help.

Quilting with a walking foot is technically (IMHO) not free motion quilting. With a walking foot, the feed dogs are still activated so they can work in conjunction with the walking foot to (hopefully) prevent wrinkles in the fabric sandwich. Quilting with a walking foot is more suited for stitching in straight lines or stitching in the ditch. In this mode, you would not pull or push the fabric as the machine should do that.

FMQ Free Motion Quilting requires the operator to manually move the fabric sandwich under the needle. There are some sewists who do not use a presser foot, however, if you value your fingers, it would be best to use, at a minimum, a darning foot. Darning feet and free motion quilting feet are shorter than a regular presser foot so it does not make contact with the feed dogs or the needle plate. The space between the needle plate and darning foot is what allows a sewist to maneuver the fabric. Usually, the feed dogs are lowered when performing FMQ, but there are some sewists who don't. It's probably a matter of preference.

Most older sewing machines included a darning foot in the accessory kit. Newer sewing machines may have several presser foot options for FMQ. In addition, there are many FMQ presser feet available on the market that can be ordered to fit your specific machine, ie Big Foot.
Nancy Notions Trusted by sewing enthusiasts for more than 3 decades

There are a wide variety of FMQ presser feet, some have springs so they "hop" on the fabric, some are metal, others are clear plastic, some are full circles, others are not round or may be open toe. There are also special presser feet that have a thicker base made for FMQ with rulers--the thicker base helps prevent the ruler from slipping under the presser foot and being struck by the needle.

In addition to the multitude of FMQ presser foot choices, there are a variety of other tools available, ie quilting gloves, quilting hoops, marking tools, pattern transfer supplies, silicone mat that covers the sewing machine surface making it easier to glide the fabric.
Amazon com Queen Size Supreme Slider Free Motion Machine Quilting Mat...

Free Motion Quilting for Beginners

There are tons of tutorials for FMQ. Just as there are many different methods, the right method is the one that works best for you. There are also lots of rules, but rules are made to be broken, so don't let someone else squelch your creativity. Quilt to please yourself.

Above all, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE. I have a small whiteboard that I practice drawing designs. Muscle memory will make FMQ easier. There is also the need to get a comfortable sewing speed along with the speed at which you move the fabric. If you are breaking needles, your fabric movement is probably too fast for the sewing speed. Also, practice moving the fabric while keeping the sewing speed consistent.

Good luck! Remember, those awesome FMQers didn't learn it overnight. Many have been doing it for over 20 years, so don't be overly critical of yourself. You'll see improvement with every project you complete.

Jan 18, 2018 | Necchi Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Why when i put the feed cover on i cant move the fabrice at all there is no room between the foot and the cover. i am trying to quilt together my quilts. thank you brenda g


I'm assuming your machine has a little plate you put over the feed dogs rather than a knob which disengages the feed dogs from moving to do free motion embroidery or something.

If this is the case there probably isn't enough room for your quilt sandwich under the foot.

You could try using a free motion embroidery foot rather than the regular foot with the feed dogs up and see if that allows you sufficient movement.

It would look like this:
10_25_2011_5_08_51_am.jpg


It may take some practice still to get a smooth stipple if that is the effect you are going for.

You may find some other ideas on quilting websites to get around this problem or in a Yahoo group for quilters. I've only ever quilted in straight stitch using my walking foot so it feeds the quilt smoothly for me, never tried FMQ.

Oct 24, 2011 | Brother XL-5130 Mechanical Sewing Machine

1 Answer

I have just started learning how to quilt and I was told I needed a walking foot to quilt the sandwich together. I purchased one today, but I don't even know how to attach the foot. I also need to...


The foot is attached as normal, but when you're attaching it, the fork-shaped part that sticks out of the right-hand-side has to be hooked around the round pillar sticking out horizontally from the right-hand-side of the needle bar and that holds the needle securing screw. When the foot is down, you will see that the upwards motion of the needle bar raises the upper set of feed dogs on the walking foot - the whole purpose of the walking foot is to provide, effectively, a set of feed dogs on the top of the material as well as the toothed ones below the stitch plate - this allows multilayered or thick materials to be sewn as when doing quilting.

Jun 30, 2011 | Bernina Activa 130

1 Answer

I hav e Bernina 1150. When I attach the walking


Hi, when you quilt straight lines using the walking foot, you need the feed dogs up, to move the fabric in a straight direction under the needle. When you do free motion quilting, which is done with a darning foot, your hands move the fabric in many different directions. Since you want to be the one to move the fabric, you put the feed dogs down and you do the work. So when you use the walking foot, keep your feed dogs up. When you use the darning foot, feed dogs down.

Feb 20, 2010 | Sewing Machines

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