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New Battery, New alternator, but battery fails to hold a charge and alternator fails to recharge battery.

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Where is the location of the alternator fuse? can you show me the picture?

Posted on Jun 03, 2013

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Check the fuse for the alternator including electrical connections. check the alternator belt. tighten.

Posted on Dec 22, 2009

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1 Answer

Battery no charging


make sure you have a good battery. Alternator will not charge a bad battery, new or not. Also, charge the battery up with a charger before driving, all the alternator is to do is keep it charged, not recharge.

Feb 17, 2015 | 2004 Chevrolet TrailBlazer

1 Answer

The battery is fully charged head light come on by the dash lights will not and the engine will noy turn over


If your engine won't turn over, there are a number of problems that could be the cause, This dead battery will still hold a full charge if you recharge it. Another thing that can cause your car to not turn over are the cables that connect the battery to the starter. This is the thickest cable in your car's electrical system, and carries the most current. make sure the cables are tight and clean for a good connection. If the battery is fully charged, just drive it around. for about 45 minutes, then see if it starts good. are you sure the alternator and or battery is good! use a test light, with car off at the battery post should be at least 12.6 or better at battery. if alternator is ok, less than 12.4 battery is failing, when running, at battery voltage should be at least 13.8 to 14.2 or better if alternator is charging. Try this, In the morning after letting it sit all night test it at battery to see if it is ok! or try a new battery. this one may be going bad. Hope this helps, Good-Day!

Jul 26, 2014 | 1996 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

1 Answer

I have take out my rx 8 battery to re charge it and when I replace it the engine won't turn over.


you either have'nt recharged as it isn't holding the charge ,or have it connected the wrong way round , which i doubt, have the battery tested for holding charge , if no good the get new battery and check the alternator charge rate as could be low and not charging battery

Jun 24, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1999 Toyota Tacoma battery keeps dying


This is easy to test but you need a multimeter. Connect the multimeter to the battery and run the engine at a fast idle (say 2000 rpm). You should get a voltage reading anywhere from 14 to 15 volts if the battery is fully charged and the alternator is working. If the reading is around 12 volts, then the alternator is not working.

Jul 09, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I drove it home and it was fine, i shut it off and within five mins i tried to start it and it would crank but wouldnt turn over, i tried a few more times and it nothing, but now my battery is going low...


Hello,

The first and most likely indication of a low battery would be a hard starting problem caused by slow cranking. If the battery seems weak or fails to crank your engine normally, it may be low. To find out, you need to check the battery's "state of charge."
A battery is nothing more than a chemical storage device for holding electrons until they're needed to crank the engine or run the lights or other electrical accessories on your vehicle. Checking the battery's state of charge will tell you how much juice the battery has available for such purposes.
If your battery is low, it needs to be recharged, not only to restore full power, but also to prevent possible damage to the battery. Ordinary automotive lead-acid storage batteries must be kept at or near full charge to keep the cell plates from becoming "sulfated" (a condition that occurs if the battery is run down and left in a discharged condition for more than a few days). As sulfate builds up, it reduces the battery's ability to hold a charge and supply voltage. Eventually the battery becomes useless and must be replaced.

The charge level depends on the concentration of acid inside the battery. The stronger the concentration of acid in the water, the higher the specific gravity of the solution, and the higher the state of charge.
On batteries with removable caps, state of charge can be checked with a "hydrometer." Some hydrometers have a calibrated float to measure the specific gravity of the acid solution while others simply have a number of colored balls. On the kind with a calibrated float, a hydrometer reading of 1.265 (corrected for temperature) indicates a fully charged battery, 1.230 indicates a 75% charge, 1.200 indicates a 50% charge, 1.170 indicates a 25% charge, and 1.140 or less indicates a discharged battery. On the kind that use floating balls, the number of balls that float tells you the approximate level of charge. All balls floating would indicate a fully charged battery, no balls floating would indicate a dead or fully discharged battery.
Some sealed-top batteries have a built-in hydrometer to indicate charge. The charge indicator only reads one cell, but usually shows the average charge for all battery cells. A green dot means the battery is 75% or more charged and is okay for use or further testing. No dot (a dark indicator) means the battery is low and should be recharged before it is returned to service or tested further. A clear or yellow indicator means the level of electrolyte inside has dropped too low, and the battery should be replaced.

On sealed-top batteries that do not have a built-in charge indicator, the state of charge can be determined by checking the battery's base or open circuit voltage with a digital voltmeter or multimeter. This is done by touching the meter leads to the positive and negative battery terminals while the ignition key is off.
A reading of 12.66 volts indicates a fully charged battery; 12.45 volts is 75% charged, 12.24 volts is 50% charged, and 12.06 volts is 25% charged.

In recharging the battery do not attempt to recharge a battery with low (or frozen) electrolyte! Doing so risks blowing up the battery if the hydrogen gas inside is ignited by a spark.
Your charging system should be capable of recharging the battery if it is not fully discharged. Thirty minutes or so of normal driving should be enough.
If your battery is completely dead or extremely low, it should be recharged with a fast or slow charger. This will reduce the risk of overtaxing and damaging your vehicle's charging system. One or both battery cables should be disconnected from the battery prior to charging it with a charger. This will eliminate any risk of damage to your vehicle's electrical system or its onboard electronics.

Take care and good luck

NB: Your alternator might not also be charging the battery while the car is on, so try to check the alternator.

Alternators are pretty rugged, but can succumb to excessive heat and overwork. They can also be damaged by sudden voltage overloads (as when someone attempts to jump start a dead battery and crosses up the jumper connections or if someone disconnects a battery cable from the battery while the engine is running).
Sometimes alternators can partially fail. In the back of every alternator is a "diode trio" that converts the alternators AC (alternating current) output to DC (direct current). If one or more of these diodes fail, the alternator's amperage output will be reduced. It may continue to produce some current, but not enough to keep the battery fully charged -- especially at idle or low speed.
Most service facilities have test equipment that can identify these kind of problems. So if you suspect a weak alternator, you should have it tested to see if it needs replacing.
Most service facilities do not repair or rebuild alternators because it's too time consuming and requires special parts. Most will replace your old unit with a new or remanufactured unit. Your old alternator is usually traded in or exchanged for a credit (so it can be remanufactured and sold to someone else).

Oct 26, 2010 | Oldsmobile Alero Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Battery draining when off. We have recharged battery 3 times. Have tested the battery it is good. After the recharge it is dead.


It is quite likely to be a faulty diode within your alternator. This can easily be checked by disconnecting your alternator, then leaving the car stood overnight with a freshley charged battery.
If the battery holds its charge, replace the alternator.

Mar 13, 2010 | 1990 Ford Taurus

1 Answer

Car won't start. Replaced battery. worked 3 days. They said it was the alternator. REplaced with new. worked another 4 days. had it check with advance auto said battery good, starter cranking normal....


if there is no charging then its back to the alternator or the way its hooked up? did you recharge your flat battery with a mains charger after it went flat the first time? as no alternator will charge a battery from flat to fully charged,,,,even if you drove around the world none stop! the new alternator may have given up working becouse you overloaded the voltage regulator trying to recharge a flat battery witch would mean it was very week to start with?

Nov 15, 2009 | Pontiac GTO Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

My 1998 isuzu will get jump started but wont hold the charge i thought after it runs for a couple of mins it should recharge it self wats wrong snl


If the battery is bad it will not hold a charge. Have your battery checked a the local parts house or your mechanic. Also have the charging and starting systems checked to insure they are working properly. Battery should have a reading of about 12.8 volts, alternator should be putting out between 13 and 14 volts. Starter should not draw to many amps.

Oct 16, 2009 | 1998 Isuzu Rodeo

1 Answer

Battery wont hold a charge overnight but starts right away with a jump or battery charger and runs throughout the day


sounds like the electrolyte levels in your battery are extremely low which will cause it to not hold a charge except over the day when the alternator is constantly recharging it, ask a mechanic to either top it up or buy a new battery

Jun 25, 2009 | 1998 Plymouth Breeze

2 Answers

Battery not holding charge


Hi first check the alternator belt (is it loose...is it there?) if all is ok there then it could be the alternator, have a multimetre put on it it should read around 13.5 if the alternator is doing its job,
Hope this helps

Regards
Steve

Dec 14, 2008 | 1996 Land Rover Range Rover

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