20 Most Recent 1998 Suzuki GSF 1200 Bandit S Questions & Answers


Hi, Anonymous for this scenario you will need your service manual, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Suzuki, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
https://www.google.com/search?q=Oil+pressure+switch+location+1998+Suzuki+GSF+1200+Bandit+S&tbm=isch&source=univ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjNnI7hsKDhAhWs1VkKHde_BdUQsAR6BAgIEAE&biw=1440&bih=757
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvlYNEqGfE8
Suzuki GSF1200S 2001 Service Manual
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1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Mar 26, 2019


Hi, John and the usual suspects are:
1. Engine oil level and SAE weight are too low or not circulating.
2. Insufficient or blocked airflow over the engine.
3. Heavy combustion chamber carbon deposits.
4. Ignition timing retarded due to a faulty MAP, CKP, or CMP sensor.
5. Carburetor jetted too lean.
6. Leaking intake or exhaust valve.
7. Clutch slipping, brakes dragging, heavy load, towing a trailer.
8. Idling too long without moving.
9. Constant hot weather temperatures, mountain, or desert riding conditions consider adding an oil cooler and or cylinder head cooler.
10. Ignition timing retarded.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Overheating 1200
My Suzuki GSX R750 is overheating
Suzuki GSF1200S 2001 Service Manual
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1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Mar 14, 2019


Hi, Andygixxer for more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
1998 Suzuki GSF 1200 Bandit throttle position sensor part number Google...
TPS adjustment instructions here Big improvement
Suzuki GSF1200S 2001 Service Manual
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1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Oct 09, 2018


Hi, Anonymous for this scenario you will need your service manual that has all fastener torque specs and a wiring diagram on the back pages, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Suzuki, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
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Parts Specifications SUZUKI GSF 1200 BANDIT Louis Motorcycle Leisure
http://forums.banditalley.net/suzuki-bandit-250-400-faq/fork-oil
Suzuki GSF1200S 2001 Service Manual
https://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-suzuki
http://mybikemanuals.com/suzuki

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Oct 09, 2018


Hi, Anonymous for this scenario you will need your service manual that has all fastener torque specs and a wiring diagram on the back pages, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Suzuki, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
1998 Suzuki GSF 1200 Bandit engine removal Google Search
remove bandit engine from frame
Suzuki GSF1200S 2001 Service Manual
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http://mybikemanuals.com/suzuki

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Oct 09, 2018


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Starter Circuit it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead-acid batteries. Depending on battery voltage starter relays and starter solenoids can make the same noise when you hit the starter button. You can easily determine which one is at fault by two simple tests:
STARTER RELAY- place your thumb and index finger on the starter relay and press the starter button, if you feel the click then the relay is faulty and needs to be replaced.
STARTER SOLENOID- bridge the positive and negative poles of the solenoid with a jumper wire or small screwdriver if you get a loud clunk then the solenoid needs to be rebuilt or replaced as necessary. If the engine turns over then replace the starter relay.
A motorcycle starter relay is an electronic mechanical switch that has a small coil winding around a piece of metal that requires low amperage and thin wires to be activated. When you turn on your ignition switch power 12 volts is sent to the relay coil which in turn becomes a magnetic contact point that pulls a spring-loaded contact point to itself completing an electrical circuit that allows more amperage necessary to be accessed by the starter solenoid which in turn acts in the same way as the relay but on a larger scale with its stronger heavier contacts making available the necessary amperage to turn the starter motor. If your battery has low voltage it, in turn, makes the magnetic contact point weak in trying to pull its counterpart to make a connection. These relays are usually encased in a plastic housing that is sealed depending on the quality of the product. When activated they will produce a small amount of heat to their metal components which in turn can create the perfect environment for condensation to form depending on weather conditions and how careless you may be with a water hose or sprayer while washing your bike. After a period of time, several months to several years depending on the circumstances this condensation is the starter button for electrolysis and the slow build-up of corrosion which ends by preventing the magnetic contacts in making a solid connection and alerts you to this situation with the customary greeting "CLICK or BUZZ" if you get a single loud "CLUNK" then the starter solenoid is at fault and needs to be rebuilt or replaced as necessary. The relay is inexpensive and needs to be replaced however in a pinch they can be forcibly opened cleaned and resealed with silicone. In a nutshell, motorcycle starter relays take in low amperage and send out higher amperage when activated and for curious minds, the voltage remains constant at whatever your battery reads at the time.
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing or printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Motorcycle not starting Clicking noises FIX
What to do When Your Motorcycle Won Start
Suzuki GSF1200S 2001 Service Manual
https://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-suzuki
http://mybikemanuals.com/suzuki

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Oct 09, 2018


Hi, Bigtim your fuel tap may be cracked try a new one for this scenario you will need your service, parts fiche, and owners manual if you can't find the best tool you ever bought for your Honda, despair not, for a mere zero $0 you can download another one. For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need for viewing and printing please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Leaking gas valve letting fuel into your engine cases
Bandit fuel vac problem
Suzuki GSF1200S 2001 Service Manual
OEM parts for Suzuki
http://mybikemanuals.com/suzuki

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Sep 04, 2017


Dave, I usually measure the amount of fork oil that drains out of each fork and replace with that same amount. In my experience this is not necessarily a critical spec. All bikes are different, however. Many owners and mechanics will experiment with differing amounts and weights of oil. You may consult your dealership and try to get within a couple ounces of spec. Herb.

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Mar 30, 2016


Check battery ground on engine and battery. Check main fuse.

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Mar 02, 2015


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tflWI-ieCpA

http://www.therevcounter.co.uk/motorbike-articles/34369-motorbike-brakes-beginners-information-bleeding-guide.html

Have a look at the above links. They are very good at explaining everything regarding the brakes. The clutch is done in an almost identical manner. You can get auto bleeders , but I would recommend this is a 2 man job.

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Aug 11, 2014


can you still select all gears or is it still locked up? if locked then sounds like you selected between gears and have to strip the engine to check the selecter forks etc for wear or damage ! i did this years ago !

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on May 01, 2014


make sure there is 3mm play on the clutch lever , select 5th gear while engine is running and press the rear brake to stop you moving away ! with a little revs try and set off , if clutch is worn it will slip and not stall the engine ! if this happens then replace the clutch plates !

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on May 01, 2014


check inside the ignition switch is clean and makes contact in the on position etc ! may need a new one !

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Apr 29, 2014


Remove your carburetor rack and inspect your intake manifolds and vacuum lines for cracks or separation. Remove the carburetor tops and inspect the rubber vacuum diaphragms for pin holes, cracks, and separation. After you have fixed all the leaks, then you can have your carburetors synchronized and your idle readjusted. The age of your machine means you will have lots of rubber parts that can be suspect because they are reaching there maximum age of usefulness. Good luck, you have your homework.

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Apr 15, 2014


no they are different if you have a 1200 need to get them for the 1200 or the gs500e and f models or the RF900

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Jan 27, 2014


IT'S NOT A LEVEL SWITCH. IT'S A PRESSURE SWITCH. IT'S LOCATED UNDER THE IGNITION COVER. THATS THE SMALL COVER ON THE RIGHT SIDE OF ENGINE(IF YOUR SITTING IN THE RIDERS SEAT) TOWARDS THE LOWER FRONT OF THE ENGINE.

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Jul 03, 2011


all you do is drain the oil before removing the right hand engine casing the bigger one of the two then undo all the little bolts holding the small springs in place then rmove the face plate and take out the clutch plates and replace with new ones remember to put the new ones in the same order the old ones came out there should always be a friction plate between clutch plates once done put casing back and refill with new oil
hope this helps

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Jul 03, 2011


Yes you're absolutely right on the lean mixture creating a problem for you.
First let's look at how the problem started - you stored the bike with gas in it and also no STABIL in the fuel. What happens is the fuel mixture coagulates in the fuel lines and also in the carburetor's fuel jets. At this point you may have to actually rebuild the carburetors or at least a partial rebuild.
If you get very lucky - try replacing the fuel filter and you can try this
Pour an equal amount of water and cleaning solvent into a metal pot or container. Place the container over a hot plate or similar heat source and bring the solution almost to a boil. Disassemble the carburetor and carefully remove the clogged jet from the carburetor. Remove any rubber O-rings that may be attached to the jet and submerge the jet into the warmed carburetor cleaning solution. Allow the jet to soak for 30 minutes. Remove the jet from the cleaning solution and rinse it thoroughly with clean water. Dry the Jet with air or let it sit until dry to the touch. Reinstall when Jets are all clear. Add some moisture removal liquid - or just add a quart of rubbing alcohol [ old racers trick] and you should be good to go - saving a cab rebuild expense. If you need to find out where the jets are on your carbs - please check with a dealer and ask for a BLOW APART - they will know what you want and it is FREE.
Thanks for asking FixYa
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1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Apr 11, 2010


think the disc them selfs are bigger on the 1200 than the 600...also they have diffrant brake calipers as well on each bike...so i dont think 1200 disc & calipers will fit the 600

1998 Suzuki GSF... | Answered on Mar 05, 2010

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