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THE BIKE IS RUNNING GREAT BUT i,D LIKE TO PUT A LOWER SEAT ON IT & CHOP A BIT OFF THE PIPES,PUT DIFFERENT HANDLEBARS ON IT & CHANGE THE HEADLIGHT

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  • Gregg Mahin
    Gregg Mahin Nov 16, 2017

    Hi, Bill I would really love to help you with your bike question but due to the magnitude of yesterday's solar flare the batteries in my crystal ball are dead and my mental telepathy headset circuitry was melted. I need the year, make, and model of your motorcycle please click on the word "COMMENT" below and provide this information in the box that will open and then click on the green comment box in the bottom right-hand corner after it posts I will receive an "ALERT" icon that will allow me to respond to your information. Good luck and have a wonderful day.

  • Jason Swieck
    Jason Swieck Jan 16, 2018

    my suggestion is to take it to a reputable custom shop. They can do any and all of the things you listed. I used to work at a custom shop in the 90's. And we did all of that and plenty more. Hand made exhaust, custom built and molded frames, etc.. So find one yo can trust and hand them a wad of money. Have fun.

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6 Suggested Answers

6ya6ya

6ya staff

  • 2 Answers

SOURCE:

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Handlebar Limitations For Super Glide

Stupid site just deleted my answer. I'll just say 6" pullback risers. Don't get mini apes because you'll have to buy the control cables and lines for an FDWG.

Try aftermarket akin to a De Luxe riser and clamp setup. It'll still cost you.

Carlos

Posted on Apr 23, 2009

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clay

  • 74 Answers

SOURCE: diamondback rm 20 kids bike. Can you adjust the handlebars?

Yes, there is an allen screw on the top of the stem of the handle bars.....it may also be a bolt with a head on it that can be turned with a socket or cresent wrench.

Loosen the bolt 3 or 4 complete revolutions and then wiggle the bars back and forth from side to side while pulling up. Be careful not to completely remove the screw as the piece that it is connected to will fall off and you will have to remove the bars completely to fix.

Posted on May 03, 2009

Anonymous

  • 398 Answers

SOURCE: How do I get the seat and the handlebars on???

click on this to get your free set up. book.http://www.huffybikes.com/Support/OwnersManuals.aspx

hope this helps you. sawdust.

Posted on Aug 10, 2009

Anonymous

  • 484 Answers

SOURCE: How to stop the creaking sound in a new full

Well that's a hard problem to solve without having the bike here, not hearing the noise. Make sure your chain is lubricated (with bike chain oil, not WD40), because this is the foremost cause of weird bike noises in my experience. The other thing, is it a Target/Wal-Mart/CostCo/Etc bike? these bikes have REALLY inferior parts and they will indeed squeak and squeal.

Regards,
matt

Posted on Sep 14, 2009

Anonymous

  • 70 Answers

SOURCE: Mongoose Handlebar adjustment

where the bars slide into forks there should be a allen nut on the top undo this slightly and adjust bar height then tighten up allen nut

Posted on Apr 03, 2010

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1 Answer

Upgrade headlights


Looking on eBay, or at local auto parts shops you can often find HID kits to suit your bikes globe size. They take a bit of wiring and need a bit of room to mount the ballasts, but they make a great deal of difference if you do a lot of riding at night.
The alternative, of course, is to get a small set of driving lights fitted. I friend of mine had a set of small LED light bars fitted to the front of his KLX450 above the headlight shroud. They aren't too large, and have a small on-off switch on the handlebars linked to the headlight wiring. Best part is LED lights draw less current, and create less heat than conventional globes!
Hope that helps!

Nov 18, 2013 | 2013 BMW G 650 GS

2 Answers

Adjust handlebar height on Schwinn Varsity


I'm answering 7 years later. I have a Schwinn Varsity 2500 Bike made probably in 2015. The Schwinn Varsity Bike is not set up the same way as a traditional bike. I loosened the center compression bolt and the two side stem clamp bolts and it came loose where I can adjust it up or down but, there's nothing to tighten the slack up below. I did some research. My original post here was to add or remove a spacer. I think you can remove a spacer to lower but, I don't think the stem is long enough to add another one. I've seen they sell an extension that you can add-on to make the handle bars higher.

Jun 25, 2012 | Schwinn Cycling

1 Answer

CLutch gl1000 creeps


HiChange to bike oil
Unlikely to have to change the clutch
Clutch not disengaging
Make sure cable has only a couple of mm play. If unable to adjust at handlebars then adjust at clutch end
A quick & dramatic way to unseize clutches is to put front wheel up against a wall or similar, bike at 90 degrees to it, front brake on, with full riders weight on seat, in neutral hold clutch in & handlebars straight, rev her up to 3 - 4000rpm, brace your arms & dump her into 1st gear
The shock will generally free-up even a completely seized clutch
The other option is to strip & clean the clutch plates
Ride Safe
Bike-Doc

Jan 07, 2012 | 1975 Honda GL 1000 (K1)

1 Answer

How to change head set also replace front fork?


Loosen clamp at top of bike frame where seat slides in ...twist seat back and forth while lifting upward.......To remove ft. fork ..At handlebar assy.remove allen bolt..(some are hidden by rubber plug)..remove handlebar assy/remove large nut at top of frame where handlebar slides down in..
...twist and pull to remove front fork....some have upper and lower nut depending which bike.

Feb 27, 2011 | Cannondale Jekyll 600

1 Answer

To heavy


you can drill holes in the handlebars through the center piece, or chop off part of the seat post that isn't being used and drill holes in the seatpost where it is used. other than that buying lighter parts is the only way to go

Jan 03, 2011 | Mongoose 20-Inch Gravity Games BMX...

1 Answer

How bike size is measured?


So what does "different frame size" actually mean? And what does that frame size number, 13" or 25" or whatever, mean? It's fairly simple.

The frame size number comes from the length of the seat tube. The seat tube is that nearly vertical tube of the three big tubes that make up the "main triangle" of the bike frame. The seat tube has the bike's saddle attached at the top, and has the pedals and crank arms attached at the bottom. A short seat tube will make the pedals closer to the saddle; a long seat tube will make the pedals further away. The frame size number is the length from the center of the crank arm spindle (the axle that holds the two crank arms together) up to the top of the seat tube (where the saddle and seatpost are attached). On some bikes this is measured in inches, on others in centimeters.

But that's not the only dimension that changes for different frame sizes. As bicycle frames get taller, they also get longer. That means the distance from the saddle to the handlebars gets longer. This makes sense, since tall people don't just have longer legs than short people. They usually also have longer arms, a longer torso, and so on. So the bike frame also needs to get longer in every direction for a taller rider, not just longer from pedal to saddle. The top tube gets longer, which pushes the handlebars further away from the saddle. The head tube (the frame part that the fork attaches to) gets taller, so the handlebars will be higher up. All of these dimensions and more are fine tuned in every frame size, so the right size frame for a person's height fits well everywhere, not just in the saddle.

Dec 21, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

How size is measured? So what does “different frame size” actually mean? And what does that frame size number, 13” or 25” or whatever, mean?


The frame size number comes from the length of the seat tube. The seat tube is that nearly vertical tube of the three big tubes that make up the "main triangle" of the bike frame. The seat tube has the bike's saddle attached at the top, and has the pedals and crank arms attached at the bottom. A short seat tube will make the pedals closer to the saddle; a long seat tube will make the pedals further away. The frame size number is the length from the center of the crank arm spindle (the axle that holds the two crank arms together) up to the top of the seat tube (where the saddle and seatpost are attached). On some bikes this is measured in inches, on others in centimeters.

But that's not the only dimension that changes for different frame sizes. As bicycle frames get taller, they also get longer. That means the distance from the saddle to the handlebars gets longer. This makes sense, since tall people don't just have longer legs than short people. They usually also have longer arms, a longer torso, and so on. So the bike frame also needs to get longer in every direction for a taller rider, not just longer from pedal to saddle. The top tube gets longer, which pushes the handlebars further away from the saddle. The head tube (the frame part that the fork attaches to) gets taller, so the handlebars will be higher up. All of these dimensions and more are fine tuned in every frame size, so the right size frame for a person's height fits well everywhere, not just in the saddle.

Dec 16, 2010 | Cycling

1 Answer

I would like to lower my sporty by 2 inches,using a thinner seat or different shocks. The stock shocks are 13" is it ok to go to 11.5" adftermarket shocks and is there any complications due to...


There is a complication to changing to the shorter shock. That is that when you hit a bump, the rear tire is going to rub the underside of your rear fender unless you set the dampening very stiff. If you can find a thinner seat, you can lower the bike by about an inch before you start running into problems. Also, the lower your go with the bike, the less "lean angle" you have available to you when riding the bike. In other words,once lowered, if you lean your bike over too far, you'll scrub the pipes or the kick stand.

Good Luck
Steve

Nov 29, 2010 | 2001 Harley Davidson XL 1200 C Sportster...

2 Answers

Handlebars loose


Construct shims from aluminum (soda / cola) cans with scissors. Be careful not to cut yourself, sheared aluminum is very sharp. After you have cut a wide strip of aluminum, wrap it around the handlebar and put it between the handlebar and the clamps. This will increase the diameter of the handlebar and allow your clips to exert more pressure on the handlebars making them tighter. Try not to leave any aluminum exposed after fixing it; it's sharp.

Jun 15, 2009 | Dahon 7 Speed Folding Bike

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