20 Most Recent Kenmore 659 Electric Dryer - Page 8 Questions & Answers


The heat is regulated with a Klixon mounted next to the blower housing near the vent pipe so it can judge the temperature of the air coming out of the drum.Right next to it is a melting type fuse.6aed02c.jpg If the dryer runs and gets too hot the fuse will melt.But the dryer will still run. So if the fuse is good(continuity) and the dryer control(cycle) thermostat is also good then you should have power going to the gas valve assembly when the machine is running unless the timer is in the no heat or wrinkle free/cool down mode. When the gas valve assembly is energized the flame sensor a%20flame%20sensor%202.bmp flame sensor mounted outside the burner chamber detects the heat from the ignitor. When the heat is very intense then the sensor shuts down the igniter
a%20igniter.jpg Igniter and that frees up the power so that the coils can be fully energised and open the gas gates. The gas comes out and hits the red hot igniter and you have ignition. It stays on for maybe 2 or 3 minutes or until the control thermostat is satisfied and shuts down power to the gas valve assembly.
If your gas dryer has a good flame sensor and a good igniter AND the dryer will work some and quit, replace these: dryer%20coil%20kit.jpg Gas operator coils The coils get hot and quit on these machines when they get a little age on them. It is aggrevating because it is a hard to diagnose thing. But well worth the 20 bucks.


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Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 22, 2008


Yes the kenmore uses the roller wheels . dr fixit in the service providers has them. Any way I can help otherwise?

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 15, 2008


if the ignitor is coming on the problem is most likely a coil. There are three on the valve a booster coil a holding coil and the main coil. Remove the coils and take to a reputable appliance person to check.

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 13, 2008


COULD BE BROKEN BELT OR IDLER PULLEY , IF SO WORTH THE FIX

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 09, 2008


CHECK FIRST TO SEE IF YOU ARE GETTING 220 VOLTS TO DRYER ITSELF WILL RUN ON 110 BUT WILL NOT HEAT , CHECK FUSES IF ANY CIRCUIT , RESET BREAKER EVEN IF IT DOES NOT APPEAR TRIPPED CHECK FOR 220 VOLTS @ SOCKET THEN TALK TEAR DOWN

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 09, 2008


before you take it apart make sure you have not lost 1 phase of the 220 volt line into dryer , dryers will run and appear fine on 110 volts be will not heat check fuse or breaker and re-set breaker even if it does not appear tripped , if fuse in line turn off power and remove fuses and check with an ohm meter , then if you have a volt meter check for 220 volts @ socket of dryer , then we will talk dis-assembly

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 09, 2008


call sears parts line they are about the same as everywhere else

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 09, 2008


check the heating elements.

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 06, 2008


your vent is holding heat and it cause it to burn out and also check the element itself

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 05, 2008


1. Gas valve coilsIgniter glows, then shuts off without igniting gas - the problem is probably with defective coils (black, located on top of the gas valve). It is recommended to replace all coils (usually two or three) if found defective.

Note: Sometimes the whole gas valve may be defective, thus not letting the gas out. However, this problem is not common.

2. Thermal fuse
Most dryers have a thermal fuse, which burns out when the dryer overheats, in which case the dryer will either not run at all or stop heating. The fuse is usually located on the vent duct, inside the dryer. A blown fuse will show no continuity when measured with a meter. Before replacing the fuse, make sure the blower wheel is not broken or clogged, and there is nothing blocking the venting.

Note: It is recommended by most dryer manufacturers to replace a hi-limit thermostat when replacing a thermal fuse.

3. Igniter
Igniter may burn out or break. Replace the igniter if found defective.

Note: Igniters are very fragile and break easily. It is recommended to handle the igniter only touching the ceramic part of it (usually white in color).

4. Flame sensor (or radiant heat sensor)
Replace the sensor (located near the igniter) if found defective.

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 03, 2008


1. VentingMake sure the dryer vent hose, as well as the rest of the vent duct, is not clogged.

Unless regular maintenance is performed, chances are there is a lot of lint accumulated inside the dryer. This might affect the drying time and could be a fire hazard. Make sure to have your dryer cleaned regularly. Because this might involve taking most of the dryer apart, it is recommended to have a qualified appliance repairman perform this task.

2. Thermostat
There are a couple of cycling thermostats inside the dryer. If one of them breaks down, it might affect the dryer's performance. Replace the defective thermostat.


Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 02, 2008


1. VentingMake sure the dryer vent hose, as well as the rest of the vent duct, is not clogged.

Unless regular maintenance is performed, chances are there is a lot of lint accumulated inside the dryer. This might affect the drying time and could be a fire hazard. Make sure to have your dryer cleaned regularly. Because this might involve taking most of the dryer apart, it is recommended to have a qualified appliance repairman perform this task.

2. Thermostat
There are a couple of cycling thermostats inside the dryer. If one of them breaks down, it might affect the dryer's performance. Replace the defective thermostat.


Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 02, 2008


1. No power to the dryerMake sure there's power getting to the dryer. Check for a tripped circuit breaker or a blown fuse. Check the wall socket for power with a voltmeter or by plugging something else in.

2. Door switch / Door switch actuator lever
The dryer would not start with a broken door switch. Replace the door switch if found defective.

Most dryers have a door switch actuator lever - when you close a dryer door, it presses against the lever, which actuates the door switch. If the lever is broken, the switch would not activate and the dryer would not start. Replace the lever, if broken.

Note: Door switch actuator lever usually comes with the door switch assembly and it is recommended to get the whole assembly since there is almost no price difference between the door switch assembly and just the lever. Check your model for more details.

3. Thermal fuse
Most dryers have a thermal fuse, which burns out when the dryer overheats, in which case the dryer will either not run at all or stop heating. The fuse is usually located on the vent duct, inside the dryer. A blown fuse will show no continuity when measured with a meter. Before replacing the fuse, make sure the blower wheel is not broken or clogged, and there is nothing blocking the venting.

Note: It is recommended by most dryer manufacturers to replace a hi-limit thermostat when replacing a thermal fuse.

4. Timer
Replace if defective (note: uncommon problem).


Kenmore 659... | Answered on Dec 02, 2008


Have you checked your electrical panel? Dryers are fed off a 220v line. One side (110) is for the motor and controls and the other is for the heating element. Many times people dont check their electrical panel and one breaker is tripped. I hope it is that easy!

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Nov 25, 2008


yes try starter 1st relay ect

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Oct 11, 2008


Probably too late to help either of you since this is so old but there are two possibilities (assuming everything else works as normal).

1st
If you really mean the circuit breaker to your house, then the heating element is bad and pulling too many amps. It may be shorting out when it gets hot due to the expansion of metal.

2nd
If you mean a switch on (or in) the dryer then you mean a thermal breaker (or thermal fuse). The most likely problem is that the exhaust vent for the dryer is plugged up with lint either within the dryer itself or in the part that is in your wall and exits someplace outside (could be as far as the roof). When the hot air can't escape the dryer overheats and shuts off to prevent a fire.

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Sep 22, 2008


If you have a receiptical proble loose one leg or ground. This can cause this. If your plug is not in all the way that could show the same problem

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Aug 02, 2008


The heating element DOES cycle on and off through the cycling of the high limit thermostat. When was the last time you inspected the dryer vent and/or inside the dryer for lint? This sounds like you could have a couple of possible issues. Either you have a dryer that can't breath (Meaning, the vent hose is clogged from where it leaves the dryer to the vent outside. Or...the dryer may be clogged inside the air baffle inside the dryer where the lint screen goes.), or you could have a high limit thermostat that is malfunctioning. Now...the dryer will get hot to some degree, but it shouldn't be excessive. Here's a recommendation:

1. Remove the dryer vent hose from the dryer and turn the dryer on. Is the air leaving the dryer forceful and warm? (it should measure about 140 degrees F) If so...you probably have a clog or kink in the ducting somewhere between the dryer and where it exits the house. If the air is weak and cool, you will need to inspect your dryer interior to find what is obstructing the air flow. Rodents are notorious for building nests inside the event line or air baffle.

2. Can you access the heating element so you can see it? Start the dryer with the casing removed so you can watch the heating element. The element should glow red, but not so bright that it glows like the sun, and it should cycle on and off. If it glows continuously, the high limit thermostat is a likely suspect and should be replaced. (NOTE: It is recommended that you replace the high limit thermostat and thermal cut-out at the same time. Some manufacturers will sell the two as a pair).

HINTS: If you have a lint screen in the door, you should be able to access the heating element by removing a panel under the door. If your lint screen is on top of the washer, you will have to remove the rear panel of the dryer to see the heating element.

If the dryer is left to run in an overheat condition, the thermal cut-out and/or heating element will eventually blow. It is recommended that you inspect the dryer to see what is causing your current problem.

CAUTION: Always unplug the dryer if you are servicing the inside of the unit. Dangerous voltages are present even with the unit turned off. Also, unplug the dryer if you have to remove the rear panel. The 220VAC terminal is directly behind the panel and can cause electric shock if touched.

I hope this information helps you. Do your homework and post back if you need any further assistance.

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Jul 02, 2008


With out a sensor you auto dry will not work (less dry/more dry)

the sensor is just inside the door to the right two metal lines ... take a wet towel and make sure that the sensor is clean...

I would suggest you check the vent that it is clean and clear and open...

also check the #8577274 Thermistor

hope it helps

Kenmore 659... | Answered on Jun 21, 2008


If the dryer turns on, drum spins, but you have no heat, any of the following components could be bad:

Heating Element
Thermal Cut-Out
Hi-Limit Thermostat

All these components COMBINED, should cost less than $100. If you fix it yourself, you will avoid the additional cost for labor.


If the dryer isn't blowing ANY air at all, but the drum still turns, you may have a bad blower fan assembly inside the dryer. Or, the blower fan assembly may be clogged.

If your dryer performance has been failing (i.e., clothes taking longer to dry), it may be for a reason. You need to ask yourself when the last time you cleaned the dryer ventilation. If you can't remember, or if it has never been done, this can contribute to the dryer failing. All dryers need proper air flow in order to dry properly. If the ducting becomes clogged, the heating circuits will actually overheat and eventually fail. This usually results in the Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) blowing or the Heating Element failing or BOTH. When these components fail, they must be replaced. Remove the dryer hose from the back of the dryer and inspect it thoroughly from where it leaves the dryer to where it exits your home. It should be clear with no kinks or clogs. If your vent line runs under a crawl space make sure it is suspended above the ground and has no sags where lint could collect. RULE OF THUMB: The SHORTER and STRAIGHTER the vent duct, the BETTER. After you inspect the vent ducting, turn the dryer on and make sure you have forceful air flow coming form the dryer. This will prove that your blower fan is working properly or not. Since you stated that your dryer is not currently heating, the air will be cold, but you should still have some force behind it. If the air flow is weak, you need to clean the duct work INSIDE the dryer. It is important to keep a dryer checked routinely. I recommend once per season (that's 4 times per year). Dryers are the cause of many house fires. These fires are due to lint accumulations inside the unit catching on fire. A little preventive maintenance can prevent significant problems in the future.

Getting to the heating circuit to determine if the components are good or bad is the next step. If your dryer has the lint screen on the top of the unit, you will need to remove the back panel of the dryer to expose the heating circuits. If the dryer has the lint screen in the door, you will need to remove the lower kick panel under the door by using a putty knife to release the retaining clips. They will be located along the seam in the front about 2 inches in from each side. You have to remove the entire front panel on some models. This is accomplished by lifting the dryer top and removing the screws that hold the front panel in place.

NOTE: The heating circuit should be troubleshot with the dryer UNPLUGGED. Dangerous voltages are still present with the dryer turned off. Resistance readings are as follows:

Heating Element (located inside heater box) – remove the two RED leads from the ceramic terminals on the heating element and take a reading across the terminal points. It should read 9 - 13 ohms.

Thermal Cut-Out (TCO) (mounted to the heater box.) - unplug wires and take reading across connector tabs. Reading should be 0 ohms.

Hi-Limit Thermostat (mounted to the heater box, closest to the heating element leads) - unplug wires and take reading across connector tabs. Reading should be 0 ohms.

If any of the above readings are abnormal, replace the component. NOTE: If the TCO or Hi-Limit Thermostat is defective it is highly recommended by most manufacturers to replace BOTH components at the same time. They are often sold as a set.


I hope this information is helpful to you. Post back with comments if you have any further questions.




Kenmore 659... | Answered on Apr 01, 2008

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