20 Most Recent Whirlpool LGR3624JQ Gas Dryer Questions & Answers


On some dryers when in Automatic the timer don't move all time
it moves at certain times and don't move for a while. Heat sensor may be bad or the dryer is clogged up with lint . The vent to the outside could be clogged up too. I would run it for a while & see if the timer moves in automatic. If it moves all time in timed dry the timer is most likely ok. Hope this helps good luck.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Jul 16, 2018


We're sorry to learn of your experience. We recommend service for a proper diagnosis. If further assistance is needed, please email us at Whirlpool_Reviews@Whirlpool.com at your earliest convenience with the website you reached out to us on (fixya), brief description of your concern, your name, address, a phone number and best time to reach you along with your model and serial number.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Jan 17, 2018


check door switch motor can be over heating start button may be defective most costly timer or motor

Whirlpool... | Answered on Dec 06, 2013


What solenoids are you referring to?

When you set the timer and heat selector switches on your dryer and press the button [switch] to turn it on, the direction of 120VAC passes through the heat selector switch through the timer switch through the cycling thermostat through the hi-limit switch, through the thermal cut-off fuse to the burner assembly's gas valve.

Simultaneously, as the current is traveling through a path to the 1st gas valve coil, current is also traveling through a path to the flame sensor- and then to the igniter.

The igniter will begin to glow and when it gets hot enough, the flame sensor will detect the heat and switch off. which then diverts current to the second gas valve coils.

The second gas valve coils activate plungers in the gas valve which allows gas to flow out into the burner housing. The igniter still being hot, ignites the gas to a long blue flame.

To maintain the proper air temperature, the heat in the blower housing is monitored by the cycling thermostat. During normal operation, air temperature should be between 120 degrees Fahrenheit and 160 degrees Fahrenheit.

When the air reaches the proper temperature specific to your dryer model, the cycling thermostat will switch off the voltage to the burner assembly.

The hi-limit thermostat and thermal cut-off fuse monitor the drum air temperature. If there is an air flow problem [restriction or total blockage], the hi-limit thermostat may switch off the voltage to prevent damage to the dryer.

Eventually, if the air flow problem [restriction or total blockage] is not corrected, the thermal cut-off fuse will fail (blow) and the dryer won't heat at all.

Check continuity to the following components, thermal cut-off fuse, hi-limit thermostat, igniter, flame sensor, and cycling thermostat. Of course you will take your readings with the power cord of the dryer unplugged from the wall outlet.

You will either disconnect [isolate] any of the wire leads going to their respective components during the test [using a multimeter (analog or digital)]; OR remove each of the components entirely from the dryer to test them.

1.) A good thermal cut-off fuse will have 0 Ohms of resistance. On the other hand, if the needle [on a an analog tester] does not move OR the digital display [on a digital meter] has not changed significantly, there is NO continuity - which means the fuse has burned out and needs to be replaced

2.) A dryer's Hi-Limit Thermostat is activated by hi-temperature changes (between 250 degrees Fahrenheit and 300 degrees Fahrenheit.

A good hi-limit thermostat will have 0 Ohms of resistance at room temperature.

To test the thermostat's response to temperature change, place the component on an electric griddle or skillet. Set the heat on the skillet or griddle to the appropriate temperature according to the temperature rating stamped on the hi-limit thermostat you are testing. If the hi-limit thermostat switches off within 5% of that temperature, the part is functioning properly. However, if the hi-limit thermostat does not switch off OR switches off prematurely, the hi-limit thermostat is faulty and will have to be replaced. [Remember, when the switch turns off at the appropriate temperature level- you should get a high resistance reading to show that the circuit is "open")

3.) Perform the same procedure as step 2 to test the Cycling Thermostat: First at room temperature and then its response to temperature change. The only difference is, the test temperature range will be somewhere between 120-160 degrees Fahrenheit Once again, refer to the temperature rating stamped on the component you are testing- and the 5% tolerance remains the same, too.

4.) The resistance reading for the igniter is between 50 and 400 Ohms of resistance; anything else, it's faulty- toss it and replace it.

5.) You should get a resistance reading of 0 Ohms at the flame sensor-

Flame sensors are tricky though. Flame sensors could still short out and
allow the igniter to glow- but would prevent voltage from reaching the gas coil. For example, the igniter will glow and not turn off and a flame will not be established because there was no voltage at the gas coil to open up and release gas for ignition.

Hope this info helps...I would appreciate a follow-up from you when you resolve this problem- to gain more knowledge and skill.

Thank-you and best wishes on your project

Whirlpool... | Answered on Dec 05, 2013


A gas dryer has a thermal cut-off fuse and a hi-limit thermostat.

The following link is a video of what you would be looking for BUT may not be identical in location to the model Whirlpool you own: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Xmdnc4-9Nw



A common reason for a thermal cut-off fuse to blow is because there is a clog in your venting system.



So before you do anything, unplug the gas dryer from the wall outlet.

Turn off the gas (shut off valve) to the dryer.



Slowly pull the clothes dryer away from the wall; disconnect your vent line from the dryer. Then remove the lint screen from the dryer.



Using a lint screen brush, from the front of the dryer and with a vacuum hose (preferably a shop vac) connected to the back (bottom) end of the exhaust vent - do a thorough cleaning and remove all the lint.



(Note: I own rental property, so besides my own clothes dryer, I vacuum out my tenant\'s dryers at least once a year.using the LintEater Dryer Vent Cleaning System; http://www.rewci.com/lirodrveclki1.html

There\'s an instructional video on the same page- and no, I have no personal or financial interest in this company- just passing on good product information)



You\'ll want to clean the entire length of the duct work all the way out to the exhaust flap on the outside your house.



I\'m telling you this because if it is the thermal cut-off fuse that blew and you replace it while the venting system is still clogged, you\'ll end up with the same problem of blowing the fuse again; and risk the possibility of a fire or carbon monoxide poisoning.



BTW, make sure you are using rigid metal pipe for venting the exhaust from the dryer DO NOT use plastic, thin foil, or non-metallic flexible duct lines. Believe it or not, sometimes the lint fibers act like burning embers in the duct line, so you don\'t want them to burn through the flimsy material- and of course you don\'t want dangerous carbon monoxide gases that should be venting outside, - building up in your home. (As a matter of fact, I even have a carbon monoxide detector system monitored through my alarm company that covers my gas fired furnace, water heater, and dryer. I have seen first-hand the devastating effects from dryer fires; property, life, and limb!)



When you use rigid metal pipe for venting, don\'t screw the pieces together- the screws, when they protrude into the duct work, can catch lint; use HVAC / appliance rated duct tape to join and seal the duct joints together.



When you replace the thermal cut-off fuse you should replace the hi-limit thermostat too! They are usually sold as a set.



You can perform a continuity test on both parts to see if they are defective.



1.) Unplug the dryer. Remove the back panel

2.) Disconnect the wires from the thermal cut-off fuse and the hi-limit thermostat to test them. You\'ll need a multi-meter; you\'ll set the multu-tester to read resistance, measured in Ohms.



Set your multimeter to the R x 1 scale and touch the leads to the thermal cut-off fuse terminals to test for continuity. If you get an infinite reading, replace the cut-off fuse. It\'s the same testing procedure for testing the hi-limit thermostat.



For a visual "how to" testing procedures on the hi-limit thermostat go to:

http://youtu.be/WJB8Y2tjYks



I\'ve also included this link, "How it works, Gas Dryers" http://youtu.be/mcipN8bvpa0 for your benefit.



Best wishes on your project repair!


Whirlpool... | Answered on Dec 04, 2013


The sensor when cold should allow power through it. If it is open internally it will not allow power to get to the ignitor. If you have a meter it should show continuity or 0 on the meter. If you get OL on the meter or no action on an analog type meter the flame sensor is open or dead internally. One way to check it without a meter is to bypass it by touching the 2 wires together while the dryer is operating. (not recommended for the novice) What it does is allow power to get to the ignitor, when the ignitor gets hot enough it allows the ignitor to shut down. Power however is shifted to the solenoids whenever the ignitor is hot only. So heat from the ignitor hold open one of them coils as long as it is kept hot by fire. If for some reason the fire was not there the ignitor would cool off and the gas would be shut off. Clever ain't it? How about a home video showing the operation in action?

If you need further help, reach me via phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/dan_73bbd84fe1d95b61

Whirlpool... | Answered on Aug 29, 2013


The majority of the time this problem is because the dryer vent is plugged. Remove the vent hose or pipe and clean it out, removing all lint buildup. Check the damper door where the dryer vents outside for obstruction. Make sure your lint filter and the area it goes into are clean as well. This will fix the problem 9 times out of 10.

Whirlpool... | Answered on Aug 02, 2013


put back back on with top off remove screws in top corners of front panel remove bottom panel and screws holding blower/lint screen housing on remove door springs remove screws on bottom corners of front belt is probably lying in bottom

Whirlpool... | Answered on Feb 18, 2013


Hi, If you are having problems with your gas dryer not heatingthe most common problem is that the ignitor goes bad. Even though it glowssometimes it is still not working properly. if you dryer is gas check out this gas no heat tip.... If you have an electric dryer, you can have many differentthings that can go wrong causing the dryer not to heat. check outthis electric no heat tip...

heatman101

Whirlpool... | Answered on Aug 14, 2011


Hi, If you are having problems with your gas dryer not heatingthe most common problem is that the ignitor goes bad. Even though it glowssometimes it is still not working properly. if you dryer is gas check out this gas no heat tip.... If you have an electric dryer, you can have many differentthings that can go wrong causing the dryer not to heat. check outthis electric no heat tip...

heatman101
; ;' ';'

Whirlpool... | Answered on May 08, 2011


Hi,

If you are having problems with your gas dryer not heating the most common problem is that the ignitor goes bad. Even though it glows sometimes it is still not working properly.


if you dryer is gas check out this gas no heat tip....


If you have an electric dryer, you can have many different things that can go wrong causing the dryer not to heat.


check out this electric no heat tip...


heatman101

Whirlpool... | Answered on Apr 02, 2011


Hi,

If you are having problems with your gas dryer not heating the most common problem is that the ignitor goes bad. Even though it glows sometimes it is still not working properly.


if you dryer is gas check out this gas no heat tip....


If you have an electric dryer, you can have many different things that can go wrong causing the dryer not to heat.


check out this electric no heat tip...

heatman101




=-=-=-

Whirlpool... | Answered on Mar 04, 2011


Hi,

If you are having problems with your gas dryer not heating the most common problem is that the ignitor goes bad. Even though it glows sometimes it is still not working properly.



if you dryer is gas check out this gas no heat tip....



If you have an electric dryer, you can have many different things that can go wrong causing the dryer not to heat.



check out this electric no heat tip...


heatman101

Whirlpool... | Answered on Feb 14, 2011

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