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Yaesu ft 101b

Band selection switch does not match frequency being received. 11m = 40m,10a = 20m, 10b = 15m. Crystals in correct location and switch leads does not look to have been resoldered.

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  • 33 Answers

Not having the panel in front of me to look at, I cant be positive but it sounds like the selector knob itself may be out of position, as well as the switch may have come loose and rotated in position and was tightened in the wrong place.

Posted on Oct 23, 2013

Testimonial: "Switch dial rotates switch stops correctly beginning at80m and ending at 160m. Thanks for your information!"

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6ya6ya

6ya staff

  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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stevepaint

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Yaesu FT 11R

figured out how to solve this, with the radio off, push and hold both up and down scan buttons, while powering the radio on. This will fix the problem.

Posted on Jan 10, 2009

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: Yaesu FT-26

Same problem for me also blocking on the tape amateur 144/148 MHz not of emission nor of green reception led does not ignite malgres the modifs. Have a solution thank you

Posted on Jul 27, 2009

Anonymous

  • 3 Answers

SOURCE: Yaesu Ft-60R with Kenwood TK-3107

ok guys!! i have gold for your prob huhuh
go to this website and u can get anything about all model TK
http://www.twowayradioearpieces.com/Programming-Cable-for-KENWOOD-C178-1.htm

Posted on Feb 27, 2010

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2 Answers

I am getting a "Err" message when trying to transmit


Almost always a programming issue. Somehow, the transmit frequency is not enabled or programmed correctly. Always include all the zeros when programming these. The decimal point is critical also.

May 24, 2016 | Yaesu Radio Communications

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I cant talk on any frequency over 148.000 anyone know why?!


This is an Amateur (Ham) Radio 2-meter Transceiver. It will only transmit on the 2-meter Amateur band (144-148 MHz) but has expanded receiver coverage from 136-174 MHz which includes Public Service and Commercial 2-Way Radio bands. Please note that an Amateur License is required to operate on the 2-meter Amateur Band.

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Yaesu ft 101


Sounds like the 20m mixed frequency is slightly off tune in the front end and doesn't match the tuning knob setting. This likely needs a bit of tweaking of an oscillator to put it on the straight and narrow of the IF system.

Sep 04, 2013 | Radio Communications

1 Answer

How do I program a yaesu ft-270?


I will be working from the online version of the manual located here. It may or may not be the same as your printed manual included with the radio - so you might want to download this copy.

First, let's set the radio to automatically set up repeater input shift based on the published receive frequency. By default, the 270R will transmit 600Hz up or down as determined by the band plan. This feature is called ARS and can be disabled if desired. If it does not display a frequency 600Hz up or down from the receive frequency while transmitting, is has been disabled. Let's re-enable it by performing steps #1 thru #5 on page 19 of the manual. Once completed, the 270R will automatically shift the transmit frequency (to match the repeater input frequency) as shown in the top half of the "ARS-Repeater Subbands" graphic at the bottom of page 19. The bottom half shows the export version of the shifts and does not apply to USA versions. If you have "odd splits" (repeaters that have input frequencies that are non-standard ie: other than 600Hz; or shift up instead of down and vise-versa) you'll need to manually change these later as described in VHO Split Mode on page 21. Any repeater operating on 147.000Mhz may have a shift either UP or DOWN. As you can see in the graphic, 147.000 is between the (-) and (+) shift so it could be either direction. Double check to make sure the radio matches the shift that the particular 147.000Mhz repeater you wish to access requires.

Next, create a list of repeaters that you wish to save in memory (you can check online databases to obtain the most recent information). This list should include Name, Receive Frequency, any non-standard direction or value Shift (called "odd splits), Tone Type and Tone. The name should be 6 or less alpha-numerics in length and be something that helps you identify it . This could be the name of the repeater owner: "TIM, PETE, etc. ", the name of the club that runs it: "BARC, CMARA, etc.", the city or town it is in: "BOSTON, OAKLND, etc,". You might run into names that would create duplicates when there are more than 1 repeaters there in the same location. Boston has several 2M repeaters - naming them BOSTN1, BOSTN2, etc. may help you remember them, but it will be easier still to append the decimal portion of the frequency to remember - such as in the case of a Boston repeater on say, 146.030Mhz and one on 145.150. BOS030 and BOS150 would probably be easier than trying to remember which is BOSTN1 and which is BOSTN2. Placing the names in the 270R memory is the last thing done, so don't worry too much about a name for the 270R's display just yet.

Most repeaters use CTCSS for access. Some newer repeaters use DCS. Some require or even prefer that no tone be sent at all. CTCSS is an analog frequency and a DCS code is digital data. The repeater may require one or the other to be present to "wake up" and begin retransmitting your message. All you really need to know about these two systems is the you need to match both the tone type and the tone value to successfully activate the repeater. Set the radio to your desired default power output level. Tap the VFO button once to enter VFO mode (if not already in VFO mode).

Enter the repeater's receive frequency by twisting of the tuning dial (page 13) or by direct entry (page 14) via the keypad. When using the keypad, do not enter the leading "1" of the frequency - as all the frequencies that this radio can tune begin with "1" and can not be changed. With the repeater frequency displayed, next enter the CTCSS tone for the repeater as described on page 23. If the repeater uses DCS, follow the directions that begin 1/3 of the way down on page 24 instead. As far as "TONE" and "TONE SQ" are concerned, the difference can best be described in that a radio working on a repeater system benefits from use of TONE, and a radio working on in simplex operation (no repeaters) benefits from the use of TONE SQ. Since we're programming repeater frequencies, there's no need to select TONE SQ. If the repeater strips the tone from its output, your radio will remain silent if set for TONE SQ. TONE is a much better match for our needs. Remember, you must use the DIAL to select the CTCSS tone frequency or DCS Code. Unlike the repeater receive frequency, it is not possible to directly enter the tone frequency or code via the keypad.

At this point, the radio should be displaying the recieve repeater frequency. Since automatic repeater offset is enabled - the 600Hz offset frequency and direction are set. The tone type and value for this repeater frequency have just been set in the previous paragraphs as well. Now it is time to write all this information to the radio's memory. This is detailed 1/3 of the way down on page 29 under "Memory Storage". Once you have performed step 5 in Memory Storage for this first repeater, it says to repeat this same process. This means setting the next repeater's recieve frequency, tone type and tone value - just as you have done with the first.

Once you have made sure that you have unique names assigned and the other information above, you are ready to begin adding them into the 270R's memory. You can go back add names to be displayed instead of the frequency of the repeaters if desired. Page 31 details the procedure to assign an alpha numeric name to each memory location. Make sure that you are assigning the correct alpha-numeric to the repeater by checking the frequency from time to time - don't blindly add alpha-numerics to memory channels.

This is a very tedious process. Ham Radio Outlet offers Windows programming software and transfer cable by Yaesu called "ADMS-270" for $38.95. This package allows you to easily create many lists of memories on your Windows PC & keyboard that can be uploaded and downloaded "on the fly" I highly recommend this software - or any software that allows you to program the radio from a computer rather than the radio itself.

I hope this was helpful.

Nov 29, 2012 | Yaesu Ft-270r Vhf Ft 270r Ft 270 R

1 Answer

Will not receive and transmit on 15mtrs and 17mtrs


Hi Seamus,

Is this only on those bands, not an issue with other bands?

If so, then your radio may not be fitted with the correct frequencies to transmit on those bands, they are after all allocated in part to the Amateur operators, which requires licensing to operate.

The fact you can't Tx/Rx, indicates this to be the issue.

I can't help you if you are not a licensed HAM Operator, sorry...

Enjoy the other bands available for your radio.

Cheers,
Peter

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2 Answers

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has it been opened up to talk on

Dec 17, 2009 | Radio Communications

1 Answer

How do i get expanded freqs on my ft1802 yaesu tranceiver


The FT-1802 is a 50 watt 2 meter FM transceiver. It can transmit anywhere between 144 - 148 Mhz (the FM portion) of the 2 meter ham band. It can receive anywhere between 136 - 174 Mhz without any modifications. There is a modification to enable transmit "out of band" below:

http://www.ham.dmz.ro/yaesu/ft-1802-extended-transmit-modification.php

There are few details about the results of this mod - typically these provide for transmitting on frequencies outside (above, below or both) of the 2 meter ham band. Transmitting outside of the ham band without a proper license for the frequencies in the U.S. is a violation of FCC rules.

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2 Answers

Yaesu FT 11R


figured out how to solve this, with the radio off, push and hold both up and down scan buttons, while powering the radio on. This will fix the problem.

Sep 28, 2008 | Vertex FNB-33, YAESU,FT-11R,FT-41R,FT-51R,...

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