Question about Briggs & Stratton Briggs Stratton Vanguard V - Twin Vertical Ohv Engine with Electric Start 23 Hp, 1" X 3 5/32" Shaft, ModelNo. 386777 - 0036 - E1

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37 horsepower vanguard voltage regulator what voltage is supposed to go to stator and what voltage should be at the other end while running

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  • Briggs & Str... Master
  • 6,023 Answers

Motorcycles are usually fitted with a permanent magnet rotor type alternator that supplies a 3 phase alternating current to a combined rectifier/regulator, the DC output of which should be sufficient to charge the battery and supply enough current to power all the ancillary equipment.

A fully charged 12 volt battery in good health has a terminal voltage of 13.2 and the output of the regulator should be in excess of that or half for six volt systems.

Some motorcycle systems can be remarkably complex so it is best to use a wiring diagram to aid understanding. Motorcycle batteries won't tolerate a sustained high rate of charge so some systems provide a reduced supply until the headlamp is switched on - just one of the many possible complications that could be encountered with motorcycle electrical systems, ballasted rear lights is another...

Posted on Sep 27, 2018

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6ya6ya

6ya staff

  • 2 Answers

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Anonymous

  • 10 Answers

SOURCE: I replaced my stator on my 1983 650 silver wing interstate

Where did you get the stator?? If not factory... You might want to us a volt meter and measure the resistance. You can find the resistance specs in its honda service manual. Give some more info!!

Posted on Jun 16, 2009

Benimur

Louie Role

  • 6966 Answers

SOURCE: i installed a new stator/generator and a voltage

Hi and welcome to FixYa,

The heating up would be normal as relatively, high current is passing through these wires/terminals not only to charge the battery but to power the electrics of the bike. If the regulator is working correctly, it would soon dwindle down since presumably the battery has been charged. Almost always, the connector used is not plastic but phenolic or epoxy based due to this very reason.  Another possible reason for excessive heat is that the terminals are not tighly fitted to its counterpart connector. A loose connector would result in a slight voltage drop but high current accross the connection.

Good luck and thank you for asking FixYa.

Posted on Jul 08, 2009

Anonymous

  • 13 Answers

SOURCE: the wires going to the voltage regulator keep burning up.

Common problem with poor quality parts, the regulator is the problem, the generator is working other wise you would not have fried the wiring, you answered your own question. someone telling porkies to get more money from unsuspecting client?
The regulator controls the voltage not the generator, the generator only supplys the voltage it cannot overcharge unless the regulator is not working properly, simple!

Posted on Jul 28, 2009

Anonymous

  • 221 Answers

SOURCE: wire connector between stator & voltage reg/rectifier burnt

your voltage/reg. can be tested in a couple different ways check ground res. check res. then revs. bias on diodes you have ac in dc out it sounds like you may have a diode gone bad allowing ac curent to flow causing the wires to get hot

Posted on Jul 31, 2009

Anonymous

  • 22 Answers

SOURCE: why is my 2006 street bob not charging

If the regulator was replaced and wasn't properly grounded it will not charge.

Posted on Mar 03, 2010

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How To Test The CHarging System On Your Late Model Harley-Davidson.


Use a digital voltmeter for best results, I personally like the Fluke brand of meters as they are simple to use and a very high quality tool. With the motorcycle turned off to start with. Set your meter to VDC and place your probes across the battery posts(if your memory is bad write these numbers down). If your battery is fully charged you should see between 12.2 and 13.5 VDC on the meter. Now again in VDC start the motorcycle and note the readings on the meter with the bike idling again you should see around 12.2 and 13.5 VDC slightly increase the throttle speed you should see the reading increase to between 13.5 and 14.5 VDC if this is the case your charging system is working, if you see more then 14.8 to 15 VDC with the bike running around 2000 RPM you have a voltage regulator problem and it needs to be replaced. If you see only battery voltage(meaning no increase from what your reading was with the bike off) you can have a multitude of issues happening.
1) stator could be bad
2) voltage regulator could be bad
3) battery could be faulty
4) you could even have a poor ground
First thing to check would be that your battery connections are tight and clean. Also check all the ground connections I.E The opposite end of the ground cable, also check to make sure that your voltage regulator is bolted tightly to the frame and that the ground connections is clean and free of paint(paint can inhibit a good quality ground).
Second and from my experience in Harley-Davidson this is the most common issue with HD charging systems. Its called a grounded stator. meaning that you have an unwanted ground. Set your meter to Continuity preferablly on an audible setting that will beep when you continuity.
On the left side of the bike as if you were sitting on it at the front of the primary case you will see a plug going into the primary case, this is where your stator is housed and of course we all know electrics and liquids dont mix but HD puts the two together and due to it your HD is destined to use up stators over the years.
With the key off disconnect this plug, now again in continutity,first touch your meter probes together you should hear a tone or beep. now touch one meter lead to any good ground honestly anyone of the primary case bolts should be sufficent then put your other meter lead in either of the 2 holes of the stator plug where it comes out of the primary case. If you get a tone you have a grounded stator and it needs to be replaced. This condition can exsist even if the charging system is still charging so always check for this.
Now on to testing your voltage regulator since we already have it unplugged at the stator(the plug that connects to the stator plug runs back to the voltage regulator. Follow this plugs wiring back to the voltage regulator and find the single wire that runs back to the battery or to the main circuit breaker and then to the battery. disconnect this single wire at the breaker if thats where it goes first. If it goes direct to the positive side of the battery then disconnect it there.
This time in Ohms place one meter lead on the end of the single wire and the other meter lead on either one of the pins that would normal connection to the stator. Note your reading, as a rule it shouldnt be more then 1 - 2 Ohms of resistance through any wire.
From my experience and I have done alot of charging systems for HD over the years.
First thing to go is usually the stator, when the stator goes it usually kills the voltage regulator if not taken care of right away. There is also a test for output from the stator to the voltage regulator and this is checked with all your connections tight and clean. Make sure everything is connected with the exception of the stator plug to the voltage regulator at the primary case.
Now this time your meter needs to be in VAC notice that is Volts AC for this test. You might want a friend to hold the throttle for you during this test. now place each of your meter leads in the plug coming out of the primary case(stator) start the bike up and you should see at an idle around 16 - 19 VAC if you increase the rpms you should see this reading increase as well around 17 VAC per 1000 RPMs so if your holding at 3000 RPMs you should see 50 VAC. If your getting anything below around 40 VAC at 3000 RPMs your stator is not putting out a sufficent amount of voltage and needs to be replaced. When I see this particular condition I always replace the stator and voltage regulator both as there is a good chance the voltage regulator has been spiked or over worked and will fail shortly.
Just to wrap this tip up let me say that before you attempt to change your stator or anything electrical really disconnect the battery first. The fingers you save maybe your own. I hope this helps anyone that may read it even a little bit. Good luck and thanks for using FixYa.com


on May 03, 2010 | Motorcycles

1 Answer

Looking for help charging system not charging battery on 1999 Harley Davidson fatboy


Check regulator ground by using an ohmmeter with one lead on a known good ground, such as the battery ground cable, and the other on the regulator base.
The connection where the alternator stator wires plug into the regulator could be corroded/dirty and need to be cleaned and sprayed with electrical contact cleaner and protected with dielectric grease because corroded wires going to the battery or alternator from the stator or the regulator will affect the ability of the charging system to properly charge a battery.

Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness.

AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

May 27, 2014 | Harley Davidson FLSTF - FLSTFI Fat Boy...

1 Answer

2004 Ultra classic won't charge battery


Motorcycle voltage regulator connections must be clean and tight for proper operation so it must be verified that both the AC (stator) connections and the DC (battery supply side) connectors are clean, fully inserted and locked in place with the regulator latches (they should also be coated with dielectric grease to keep them clean and corrosion free).

The motorcycle voltage regulator is a series regulator that is also a rectifier that changes stator supplied alternating current (AC) to direct current (DC) which the battery system requires. If the charging system does not keep the battery properly charged both with regards to Voltage (between 13 VDC minimum and 15.5 VDC maximum) and the current supply at a high enough amperage to meet the system lighting, ignition, TSM/TSSM, security and accessory requirements plus a minimum of 3.5 more amps (3.5 amps more than the foregoing system requirements) there are a number of tests that can be done to ascertain why.

As the voltage regulator must have a good, clean, tight (and otherwise secure) ground connection for proper operation a Voltage Regulator Ground Circuit Test can be accomplished by connecting an ohmmeter to a known good ground (like the battery negative post) and the case of the regulator. If there is continuity with little resistance the ground is GOOD and nothing more needs to be done BUT if there is NO continuity or there is more than minimal resistance the ground will need to be fixed so there is a low resistance continuity by either locating and fixing the poor ground or adding a new grounding wire from the regulator case to a know good ground.

A Voltage Regulator Power Circuit Test can be accomplished by turning OFF the Ignition, disconnecting the voltage regulator and with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting, testing for continuity between the voltage regulator wire harness supply terminal and the main fuse terminal (with the fuse removed) and if there is continuity present then the wiring circuit here is GOOD but if there is NO continuity then you will need to either find the open and repair it or replace the whole wire running from the voltage regulator to the main fuse.

As there should be no short circuit in the power supply from the regulator to battery (main fuse) wiring OR in the regulator internal circuitry continuity from these both need to be checked again with an ohmmeter set to the Rx1 setting. If the regulator to main fuse wiring connector is not disconnected from the regulator you can connect an ohmmeter with one lead on the regulator supply wire terminal end at the main fuse (with the main fuse removed) and the other lead to a known good ground. If there is NO continuity then you know that both the supply wire and the regulator are okay (as there is no short to ground). BUT if there is continuity then either the regulator or wiring or both is/are shorted to ground. To determine where there is a short circuit (i.e. either the wiring or the regulator internal circuitry) you must disconnect the DC side of the wiring harness (the connector at the DC side of the regulator) from the regulator and test between either or both ends of the wire i.e. from the regulator wire harness connector terminal and a known good ground and/or the main fuse terminal end of the wire and a known good ground. If there is any continuity the wire is shorted to ground and the short circuit must be found and repaired or the wire must be completely replaced. If there is no such continuity then the regulator DC supply terminal (with the DC side of the regulator connector disconnected) must be tested by putting one lead of an ohmmeter on the regulator terminal and the other on a known good ground. If there is continuity the regulator is shorted to ground and must be replaced. If there is a short in the wiring it is unlikely BUT the regulator could ALSO be internally shorted so it should also be checked either before or after any wiring short is located and repaired.

The voltage regulator must also properly regulate the rectified DC voltage supplied to the battery so that it is not less than 13 VDC or more than 15.5 VDC. If the regulator is not properly limiting supply voltage to the battery to 15.5 VDC or less it will be overcharging the battery. This can be tested for by operating the motorcycle engine at 3000 rpm while placing a voltmeter between the battery positive and negative posts and reading the supplied voltage. If the reading is greater than 15.5 VDC the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the voltage is less than 15.5 VDC but more than 13 VDC the regulator and the rest of the charging system are operating correctly. If the supplied voltage is less than 13 VDC the AC side of the system must be tested and if the AC side is good but the supplied voltage at the battery is less than 13 VDC then the regulator is defective and must be replaced. If the AC side of the system is not providing correct AC supply then the stator must be tested and if it is bad, replaced and if it is good then the rotor inspected (cannot be electrically tested as it consists of permanent magnets but it could be inspected fro physical damage and roughly tested for strong magnetic force fields by using a ferrous metal object to see if the attraction of the magnets is strong or weak, but this is basically a better guess rather than a precise measurement). The rotor can also be physically inspected for physical signs of damage including signs of the center hole having become oval AND the stator bolts inspected for possibly having come loose and into contact with the rotor.


AC Output Check
Disconnect the voltage regulator connector from the alternator stator wiring and then connect an AC voltmeter across both stator sockets of a two wire stator, or if a three wire stator across two of the three for example 1 & 3 and then later you will repeat the test between 2 & 3 and later between 1 & 2. THEN run the engine at as close as possible in the circumstances to 2000 RPM. The AC output should be approximately 32-40 VAC, approximately 16-20 VAC per 1000 RPM. If you have done a stator static test and the stator has proven to be in good mechanical condition and the AC output is below specifications, the charging problem is going to be a faulty rotor. If you have not done a static stator check yet and the AC output is less than as set out above it may be that the stator is defective and the static stator check will need to be done. While the regulator has nothing whatsoever to do with the alternator output, if the alternator output is good the regulator might be defective in either rectification or in limiting the output to the battery to under 15 VDC. If AC output is low and the stator has passed the static stator check then it is likely that the permanent magnets in the alternator rotor are weak. A permanent magnet can lose its magnetic strength if it is dropped or shocked such as letting it snap into place when being installed or possibly by use of an impact wrench to remove the compensator fastener etc.

Apr 28, 2014 | 2004 Harley Davidson FLHTCUI Electra Glide...

1 Answer

Great dane Chariot mower GDRZ25KHE


If this is a briggs engine, depending on the type of charging circuit it has, the AC voltage from the stator under the flywheel should be around 28 to 30 VAC and the DC Voltage coming out of the voltage regulator with it disconnected should be around 14 VDC.. If the voltage is lower than 28VAC from the stator then it is a bad stator. If the stator voltage is good and the regulator is putting out less than 13 to 14VDC that the regulator is bad.

Aug 16, 2013 | Garden

1 Answer

Testing voltage regulator


ENGINE OFF,UNPLUG the regulator, test continuity from each conductor to ground on the stator, if you have continuity STATOR IS SHORTED... if you test voltage OUTPUT at the stator, it should be around ten volts AC! NOT DC! per thousand RPM... THEN use a 12 volt test lite from regulator leads to ground, if ANY light happens at either lead, BAD regulator

Aug 02, 2012 | 2002 Harley Davidson FXDWG Dyna Wide Glide

1 Answer

For my honda cbr400, how does the stator affect the regulator rectifier? does it also affect the cdi in the process?


The stator is essentially an alternator (generator) that produces alternating current (ac). The rectifier converts the ac currect to direct current (dc). This dc currect is not very stable and is considered noisy. Alcohol, the voltage os proportional to the engine speed (rpms). Therefore a voltage regulator is added to keep the voltage at an acceptable level and not damage anything on the circuit (battery, radio, even headlights have a shorter life if too mush voltage is sent to them. If the stator is burned out (common on bikes from the early/mid 1980s, then there is no current produced and the battery ends up powering the system when you ride. The battery will eventually die and your bike will stop running. Hope this has what you need.

Jun 18, 2011 | Beta RR 400 Motorcycles

1 Answer

Model pm0525312.18 serial 914080230 engine runs good but the voltage drops of from about 125volts to 90 volts when you put on about 1500 watts. does this model have a voltage regulator? what is a bridge...


According to the parts pdf, there is no voltage regulator. Voltage is adjusted by the rpm of the engine. If your have a meter that reads hertz (Hz), you can set the engine rpm by adjusting hertz to 60 cycles (Hz). At 60 cycles the engine is running at about 3600 rpm. Most engines develop their max horsepower at this rpm. If you are loosing power/voltage and the engine speed is not dropping below 3600, than most likely could be problem with capacitor, brushes or diode (bridge diode). The diode converts ac voltage from stator to direct current to power the magnet (rotor). Check for brush wear and test capacitor for value printed on part. It should test with 5% of stated value. Diode can also be easily tested with meter. Good holidays

Dec 05, 2010 | Coleman Powermate Powermate 5000W...

1 Answer

Motor runs fin but smoke major pouring out of generator end and circuit breaker will not stay on


If you were drawing major power from generator, you may have fried capacitor or voltage regulator. Both of these parts tend to make smoke when they fail. Stator winding can fail also but rare. Remove end cap to generator. Look for melted strings that bind coils together or melted wires. This would indicate failed stator. If stator looks ok, look for capacitors that look swollen or leaking that my be easily replaced. Caps have a value printed on them and reading should be within 5%. If caps are good, look at half moon shaped regulator. Failed regulator will have melted potting compound. Good luck

Nov 10, 2010 | Honda Electrical Supplies

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