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I'm doing FMQ on a small quilt... cotton top and backing is minke. The thread is looking on the top and gathering into a jumble on the back. I'm using the open FMQ Janome foot.

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6ya6ya

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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Anonymous

  • 65 Answers

SOURCE: Threadtension wrong when free motion quilting

If the thread under the fabric is loose you need to tighten the upper tension. If it's on 4, bring it to 5. If it's on 5, bring it to six and continue doing that and sewing till its perfect. You may need to decrease your lower tension if you can't get it just right.

Bernina Sewing Machine Parts

Posted on Jan 06, 2009

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Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: janome 1600P

My husband and I worked for months trying to solve this problem and FINALLY we did it. I even had a YLI varigated thread in the top and Coats and Clark varigated in the bobbin. The machine Janome 1600P DB makes a beautiful stitch. This is a long posting and if you have questions I'll be happy to help if I can. together425@pennswoods.net
1) I give credit to piecemealquilts.wordpress.com for their recommendations.
Most of which I list below.
2) First of all make sure that the frame is level in all directions, side-to-side, top to bottom. That includes the table that it is setting on.
3) Bobbin tension: This is much looser than you normally have it set on. The bobbin should fall steadily to the floor. Read your machine manual to learn how to loosen the tension. Be sure to go in small increments. Don't be afraid. It also helps to use a different color thread in the bobbin than the top to see the problem. Is the bobbin properly inserted into the bobbin case. Is the bobbin case properly inserted into the machine?
4)Use the correct needle for your machine.
5) Use at least a 14 and a 16 or 18 is even better. Size 20 for specialty threads if you can get a size that large.
6) Make sure that the needle is inserted properly. My machine doesn't have a flat side so proper insertion is challenging. If you can find a straight pin small enough to fit in the eye do so as this helps to determine if the needle is in at the correct angle. The eye of my needle is left to right so I use a sturdy piece of thread, some spray starch on the thread helps it to stay straight. This makes it much easier to determine if the needle is in properly.
7) The pressure foot dial is set on 0
8) The stitch length is set on the longest stitch length. I know that you actually determine the stitch length and some people tell you to have it set on 0, but I found this to work.
9)Threading: Make sure you have the machine threaded correctly. Inoticed that when my thread was breaking that the thread in the take uplever was either out of the thread guides or had crossed each other. Also, sometimes the thread had wrapped itself around the first smallthread guide and/or the outside hole on the pretension thread guide hadwrapped around the bottom of the thread guide. When your thread breaks pull a good 12" out and then cut it off assometimes it has frayed higher up. This will help to reduce continuedbreakage and your frustration. This sounds dumb but still make sure the thread is sitting on the spool properly, that the thread spills off the spool as shown in your machine manual. I found it helpful to place a felt pad underneath the spool of thread. This was just a scrap of felt with a hole cut into it. Check the retractable thread guide which is right over your spool that it is correctly positioned and not twisted around. The thread should easily pull off the spool. I found that my machine worked better if I onlythreaded the two guide holes closest to the machine on the pretension guide.
10)Thread tension: I found that my needle tension had to be much looser than what I was used to anywhere from 1 -3.
11)The quilt: Not too tight and not too loose,too tight and needles and thread break, too loose and it's difficult to move the carriage. Can you poke a finger from the bottom and grip it from the top? I found this a little too loose, but used it as a guide. The side clamps are to keep it straight and not tight.
12)The take up rail should just barely clear the bed of the machine. I found it more accurate to check this with the machine in the middle of the quilt as opposed to one of the ends. Can you fit your fingers between the quilt and the machine bed? Yes, but barely is the answer.
13) I was able to quilt in both directions, but make sure your carriage moves freely in all directions.
14) Make sure the feed dogs are down and ready for free motion.
15) Make sure the presser foot is down and ready for sewing.
16) Check both the bobbin area and the top thread tension area for stray threads. It happens.
17) My last help was to add thread lubricant, but make sure your machine allows it. I just found out that you shouldn't use this on the spool if you have plastic tension discs. Mine are metal, but still I use this sparingly. I run a couple of lines on the spool, let it sit for a few minutes then sew. I don't repeat this for at least an hour of constant sewing.
18) Strangely this also helped, every so often I pulled straight out on both the knobs of the pretension disc and the tension disc. Don't pull the knobs off. This just released the tension of the thread. I didn't adjust it, I just pulled straight out. I didn't rethread it, just released it.

19) Finally, I did discover that I had a burr on my tension disc.How to figure this out, well it works better with two people, but one can do it. Lift up the presser foot, needle is in the highest position, then manually , slowly pull the thread through the needle, listen to the tension disc. You shouldn't hear anything. Watch the tension disc, does the check spring move down? Does it stay down then bounce back up? It shouldn't. Feel the thread as it is being pulled does it have tension on it? If the answer to these questions is yes, take it to the shop and let them fix it. It literally takes 5 mins.

I hope this helps

Posted on Jan 12, 2009

Anonymous

  • 87 Answers

SOURCE: Viking Lily - free motion quilting - thread loops on underside.

I need more info.
>Where is your presser fooot pressure set(1-9) it should be around 4?
>How fast are you free motioning (faster is better? from 1-10 10 being full speed.
>Is your bobbin threaded correctly (I need to cover the basics.)?
>Never never use a needle smaller than a 90/14 for free motion (I know everyone's an expert...but trust me)
After all this, it's OK to tighten your tension up on top a little when free motioning and getting eyelashes/spider webs on bottom. around 6 should do it though.

Posted on Mar 19, 2009

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: quilting

Janome now has a darning foot ie it looks like an embroidery foot with a spring designed for the 1600 models. It is metal with a ring where the needle goes down through it. I removed the plastic lens inside the ring and this seems to have resolved the problem.

I usually pull my threads to the top so I can see where they are and not getting tangled underneath.
There are several good groups on Yahoo groups which offer support for starting out on quilting

Posted on Jun 05, 2009

Mary Dunn

  • 1788 Answers

SOURCE: pfaff quilt expression 4 It shreds

Are you using the right needles, size and type? Before, you wreck your material, take it in and have it serviced. I know everyone hates to pay for service, but if you like your machine it will be worth it to have it running at its peak. Just like a car, we spend tons on them but expect a sewing machine to never need anything. Remember, it is worth it.

Posted on Sep 13, 2010

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Where can I get directions for free motion quilting on my triptonic 2030. I am having trouble with the tension and bobbin stitches are awful.


For FMQ, make sure you have a darning or FMQ foot for your machine. You must use this foot because it is shorter than other presser feet so it does not press down on the fabric. You need to be able to move the fabric freely under the presser foot. When threading your machine, ALWAYS RAISE the presser foot so the thread will seat properly in the tension disk. The presser foot is ALWAYS lowered when FMQing or the tension will not work. To set the tension, test on some sample quilt sandwiches made with the same materials you will be quilting. Be sure to use a brand new quilting, microtex, or top stitch needle in your machine. Skipped stitches generally indicate the needle is dull, bent, or otherwise damaged. Test your stitching on the test sandwiches and adjust the top tension until the top and bobbin threads meet in the middle of the fabric (Increasing the top tension pulls the bobbin thread up. Loosening the top tension allows the bobbin thread to pull the top thread down.) Depending on your thread weight, you may need to adjust the bobbin tension, but do that ONLY if you cannot get the top thread to pull the bobbin thread up into the sandwich. (However, remember that if you adjust the bobbin case, it may not work properly when you go back to regular sewing.) I actually bought a separate bobbin case that I have adjusted only for FMQing on my machine and I use it only for that purpose.

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May 31, 2018 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Thread loops on back using quilt stitch


You need to put more tention into the Corners, Try puttin a tention of 10 into the Quilt. And it should work fine. 10-12 Maximum, don't go pass 12 because it will probably Rip, or Shrill up. Hope this Helped.

Thanks for Using FixYa! -CA

Jul 14, 2008 | Elna Quilter's Dream 6003Q

1 Answer

My machine is adding loops under my stitches when I try to stitch a straight stitch, I am trying to machine stitch a quilt top!


Quilting is a bit more finicky than regular sewing. Be sure to ALWAYS RAISE the presser foot when threading the top thread. FWIW, I use a separate bobbin case for FMQ that I have tightened the tension to keep the bobbin thread from coming to the top of the sandwich, but I tend to use a finer thread for quilting so adjusting the bobbin takes care of it. In your case, however, it sounds like the top thread is staying under the fabric. I would try tightening the top tension. Also, install a brand new needle--a top stitch, embroidery, or microtex needle seem to work well for me. Test well on a sandwich made of the same fabric and batting and get it adjusted well before sewing on your quilt. Sometimes sewing speed will affect stitches under the fabric, or even on top.

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Feb 27, 2018 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

What should your tension be when doin free motion on a 7570


Every machine is different, so it really depends on your particular machine. Generally, tension for regular sewing is correct when the top and bobbin threads meet in the middle of the fabric. It's pretty much the same for FMQ, although the bobbin thread probably should not show on the top of the sandwich. . In order to do that, I have adjusted a separate bobbin case with a slightly tighter tension that I use only for FMQ. (FWIW, extra bobbin cases are usually not that expensive and it is very nice to have one on hand that is set up and ready to go at any time.) It helps to use the same color thread in the bobbin as the top so any appearance of thread on the other side will blend into the stitching.

Practice, practice, practice on scrap sandwiches before trying it on your project! Creating muscle memory is the secret to good FMQ and the only solution is lots of practice. If you can't practice stitching, then draw on whiteboards, paper, computer, whatever as long as you can practice smooth, consistent line drawing.

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Jan 25, 2018 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

How to Free motion quilting on Janome 1600P QC


Be sure to use a darning foot (or free motion quilting foot).
Use a brand new sharp needle, ie top stitch, embroidery, or microtex work well.
Check that the thread, needle, and fabric are compatible--Caution, the needle eye should be the right size for the thread weight.
AVOID old or bargain bin thread!
Be sure to drop or cover the feed dogs.
If your machine has it, use the needle down feature.
You may need to adjust the tension for FMQ--I have to tighten the bobbin tension a little to keep the bobbin thread below the quilt surface (so I bought a special bobbin case and set the tension for FMQ and that's all I use it for.)

Lots of web sites that talk about how to free motion quilt. Then, it's PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE! I use a portable white board and draw free motion designs on it (while watching TV, etc.). The idea is to get it fluid without jerking, jumping, speeding up or slowing down, etc. When your hand and brain are able to work smoothly, then you can probably do free motion quilting. Practice on scraps of fabric and batting (preferably the same kind you will be working on). Cut up some 14 inch squares of fabric and batting and draw designs on them and see if you can stitch them. Some advice: don't watch the needle...look at where you are going in front of the needle. Don't expect perfection to happen overnight. Many quilters have been FMQing for years and still make mistakes. (I've made a few quilts and my stuff still looks less than professional, but it's all mine!)

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Jul 23, 2017 | Janome Sewing Machines

1 Answer

CANT QUILT WITH MY JUKI TENSION PROBLEMS


Okay, you've tried a lot of things. The question is this: is the thread snapping (where abouts in the path), or is it shredding at the needle? Here are a few more:

Remove the top thread, ALWAYS RAISE the presser foot, and rethread from the beginning.
Try different thread--perhaps a polyester thread like Isacord or Aurafil. (AVOID old or bargain bin thread.)
Try a different kind of needle (brand new needle!)--like a top-stitch, microtex, or embroidery. The top stitch needle has a larger scarf that will better protect the thread if shredding is the issue. (I use a special bobbin case that I've increased the tension for Isacord thread and I use the same thread in top and bobbin.) I also decrease the top tension a tad so the bobbin thread will not pull to the top. You may need to install brand-new needles several times on one quilt when they get dull.
Usually an 80 or 90 needle will work for FMQ through a fabric/batting sandwich.
Check that the needle's eye is the appropriate size for the thread (also a cause of shredding thread).
Set the upper tension at the midway point perhaps a bit looser for FMQ (this tension will probably need to be tweaked for your particular machine due to wear and age).
Use an FMQ foot and drop the feed dogs. A Supreme Slider (avlb on the internet) is very helpful in helping move the quilt while doing FMQ.
Work at a moderate but steady pace. I find a faster speed while FMQ gets me into trouble...like spots I can't get out of, overlapping stitches, or outside the quilt edge.

FWIW, I still get some skipped stitches with FMQ. Usually, it happens when I move the fabric too fast, especially around a curve. I have a tendency of speeding up while going around a curve that will cause skipped stitches or eyelashing.

I'm also wondering if there is something to do with the fabric and/or batting you are using...like is it Batik? Batik is very tightly woven and presents some particular challenges. The type of batting could be more dense, making it harder for the needle to penetrate the sandwich. Also, pulling or stretching the fabric can cause skipped stitches.

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If you see no improvement in your machine's stitching, you may want to have it serviced.

Good luck!

Apr 28, 2017 | Juki Sewing Machines

1 Answer

My new Quilt Expressions 4.2 sews fine when I piece but when I fmq I have problems with thread shredding How to fix?


Shredding thread could be several things. First, make sure the thread and needle are compatible. If the needle's eye is too small for the thread, it will eventually shred the thread. There are also needles with larger scarfs that will protect the thread from shredding as it repeatedly pierces fabric. Also, trying a different brand/type of thread may make a difference--focus on good quality thread for fmq. The tension may be set too tight. Finally, there could be a burr or snag somewhere that is causing the thread to shred.

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Dec 17, 2016 | Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Janome 1600P DBX


You need to drop the feed dogs, install a darning or free motion quilting foot (make sure the presser foot is lowered). Because you will not be using the machine to move the fabric, the stitch length selection is of no importance. Make sure the stitch width is set to zero. You should test FMQ on a scrap quilt sandwich of the same makeup of your project, ie quilt fabric with batting sandwiched between. The upper tension should be set so that both threads meet in the middle of the quilt sandwich. Because it is FMQ, some extra adjustment may be needed.

Once the tension is where you want it, you can practice FMQ until you can move it smoothly in conjunction with the machine speed.

Practicing on a white board with erasable markers is a handy way to learn to move smoothly. The most difficult part of free motion quilting is learning to move the fabric smoothly. Do NOT lack for practice as that is the only way to improve. Those people who make it look simple have been doing it for years!

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Oct 31, 2016 | Janome Sewing Machines

1 Answer

Tension and free motion quilting


You don't tell us what happens when you try to FMQ. I'm assuming you get thread loops/mess under the fabric.

Be sure to install a brand new needle that is recommended for FMQ, ie top stitch, embroidery, microtex

Remove the top thread from the machine.
ALWAYS RAISE the presser foot and rethread from the beginning.
Set the top tension to the midway point and retest your machine on a fabric sandwich just like your project.
Tweak the top tension until the top and bobbin threads meet in the middle of the fabric.

This is the manual that comes up for your machine. Probably pretty similar to yours:

Singer 7466 Instruction Manual

If you are getting what is called "eyelashes," you need to match your sewing speed to the speed you move the fabric. Most often the machine needs to stitch faster to prevent eyelashing. Make sure your circles are moved at the same speed--do not speed up moving the fabric in a curve. AND-- Practice, practice, practice on scrap sandwiches, It's an acquired skill, like cursive writing. Only doing it will make you better. I like to practice on a small whiteboard when I'm watching TV. If I find a design I like, I take a photo of it before I erase the whiteboard.

https://www.quiltingboard.com/main-f1/beginning-fmq-beginner-t189467.html

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Mar 03, 2018 | Singer 7426 Mechanical Sewing Machine

1 Answer

Cannot machine quilt without the thread breaking and/or shredding. I've change needle, thread type and size and tension on my fabric.


If the thread is shredding and breaking, there is an incompatibility of your needle, thread, and fabric. Could be old, bargain bin, or poor quality thread--does the thread have little "hairs" of thread lint sticking out of it--that's probably not good quality. Look for fresh, good quality thread. Try a brand new needle--a sharp if you are sewing woven fabric. Make sure the thread is not too big for the needle eye. Sometimes, a top-stitch needle or embroidery needle will work well on FMQ. (A top-stitch needle has a longer scarf which helps protect the thread during the multiple times the needle penetrates the fabric before the thread forms a stitch. Shredding means the thread is getting worn out before it forms a stitch. A piece of thread penetrates the fabric 10-20 times before it forms a stitch.) Could also be a snag somewhere that is damaging the thread.

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Most FMQ instructions say the upper and bobbin tension should be the same, however, I find my machine works a bit better when the bobbin thread is just a little tighter than the upper thread. Then the bobbin thread does not "pop" up on the top of my fabric quite as much. It's probably something you will just need to experiment with in getting used to your machine.

P.S.--when threading your machine, make sure the Presser Foot is ALWAYS RAISED so the top thread will seat properly in the tension disk. Failure to do this will cause thread barfs (usually referred to as thread nests or bird nests) under your fabric. Also, before beginning your FMQ, ALWAYS PULL the bobbin thread to the top of the fabric, then hold both thread tails gently in your left hand while you slowly take the first couple of stitches.

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Mar 01, 2017 | Brother Sewing Machines

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