Question about Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

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EM HEAT.... does it stand for ECONOMY HEAT or EMERGENCY HEAT? They both conflict. Someone's misinformed.

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It eis essentialy for emergency heat,
whatever way your wired your secondary heat source becomes your "emergency" heat.
It could not be economy, since its only called upon when your primary heat cannot handle the load. and thats only at start up. once your within a predeterminbed temp set, your secondary heat should drop out
sometimes they wire secondary, in direct conflict with primary as to not aloow the system to use both at the same time

Posted on Oct 16, 2009

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It stands for Emergency Heat. (Back up heat) . Normally you will find it on heat pumps. It's used manually when the compressor goes out on a heat pump. It's used automatically by the unit when it's so cold outside the heat pump can't keep up. This happens when there is not enough heat in the air to draw heat from. This happens at around 23 degrees. I hope this explains what emergency heat is and what it's used for.

Posted on Oct 16, 2009

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Em heat emergency heat for heat pumps or using as in a duel fuel system gas or oil heat second source of heat

I’m happy to help further over the phone at https://www.6ya.com/expert/vincent_f7b7c5f4dedd2565

Posted on Jan 03, 2015

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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1 Answer

I have a 1800 pioneer heat pump after about 10 minutes it switches to EC I have to go to my panel and a witch it back on Why?


Emergency heating via heat elements will only run till temps get to a certain point then the elements turn off and the heart pump takes over and that is the economy setting. Emergency heat is used to quickly raise temps then heat pump takes over. The elements are very expensive to power ergo the switchover.

Aug 29, 2017 | Pool & Spa

1 Answer

When em heat is on my outside unit runs but when not on em heat it doesn't. Which setting is best to use?


Has this always been this way? When the emergency heat is on the outside unit shouldn't run. When in normal heat, no emergency heat, the outside unit should be running unless the temperature is below the balance point ( usually around 35 degrees). If this has always been this way and the outside temperature is above 40 degrees you might have your 1st stage and 2nd stage wires switched.

Nov 27, 2016 | Heating & Cooling

2 Answers

I just moved into this home and am wondering what EM heat is compared to just Heat and my outside unit is full of frost what do I need to do?


Hi, EM stands for emergency heat. You should only need to use it if the outdoor unit does not operate. You have what we call a heat-pump. If the outdoor coil is iced up, it should go into a defrost cycle to melt away the ice. You will know when it does as you will see steam coming up from the unit as though it is on fire. The outdoor fan will also shut down during this process. These units will defrost using time and temperature to defrost the coil. If the ice continues to build-up, and does not defrost every couple of hours, I would say you have a faulty defrost board or defrost thermostat. There is not alot you can do as these are very complicated systems to work on. You will more then likely have to call out a service tech to check this outdoor unit for you.It also should have heat strips in the outdoor unit for EM heat if the outdoor unit fails. If it is iced up it is on and running. Thats what I would do is keep an eye on it to see if it does defrost, and if not, you will need to get a tech out to check it. It takes special equipment to check these units. Please keep me posted.
Sincerely,
Shastalaker7

Feb 01, 2010 | Honeywell Programmable Thermostat Heater

1 Answer

Heat pump runs in em heat when outside temperature is low


Yes, you may turn to em heat only. May this confirmation help you.

Jan 06, 2010 | Heating & Cooling

1 Answer

I only have two settings. Which is which and how so?


I think you probably have a heat pump. Aux heat is electrical resistance heat coils that produce heat when the heat pump can not produce enough to keep the temperature up (caused by low outside temperature or a problem with the refrigerant system). This resistance heat can be switched on by the emerg. heat button. It also can come on automaticlly (sp) and will be indicated by the aux being shown on the thermostat. Sometime if you set the heat up several degrees by thermostat the aux will come on to help the system catch up to the desired temperature setting. The emerg. heat is a way to turn on the AUX manually. If you do not have a heat pump system then it is possible that you have a heat pump thermostat installed on a non heat pump system. Emergency heat and Aux are both the secondary.

Hope this makes sense1

Bob

Oct 17, 2009 | Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

4 Answers

Abbreviation definitions.


Economy Mode = EM
Auxelary Mode = AUX
in em mode heat pump does most of the work in aux either an electric heating element is used or gas depending on if it is gas or all electric

Oct 16, 2009 | Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

5 Answers

What's the difference between EM HEAT and AUX HEAT?


Sorry, neither of these answers are completely correct.
You have a heat pump (or the wrong thermostat). Let's assume you have a heat pump.

In air conditioning mode, it works like every air conditioner you have ever had, but...

In heat mode, it reverses its operation. Have you ever felt the air coming out of the outdoor unit of your A/C unit? It's hot, isn't it. And the air coming out of the indoor unit (out of the registers) is cold. Now for a heat pump to produce heat it simply runs the air conditioner in reverse and the heat comes out in the house and the cold is released outside. Neat, huh!

Here's the problem with heat pumps...when it is really cold outside the heat pump can't produce enough heat to heat your home. So it has an additional heat source called "Auxiliary Heat". This heat comes on automatically when the house doesn't get warm enough. The source of this heat is based on the region of the country you are in. North/Northeast generally have oil heat, other regions have gas, and still others have to use electricity to heat. In Texas, we usually use electricity as the supplementary heat on heat pumps. VERY EXPENSIVE!

Now the "Emergency Heat"...this is exactly as stated in Solution #2. This is manually turned on by YOU at the thermostat when your heat pump fails. This turns on the auxilliary heaters and turns off the heat pump (remember, the reverse air conditioner). Again, this can be quite expensive to run if your heat source uses electricity! Gas and oil may be cheaper. The emergency heat is only designed (normally) to keep the house livable (not comfortable) until the Heating Tech can get out to you and fix your heat pump.

Something else you should know. It is normal for a heat pump's outdoor coil to frost up during heating mode. It will detect this and go into DEFROST mode and melt the frost off the coil. While it is doing this, it will turn on the auxilliary heater to keep the air blowing in the house at a reasonable "warm" temperature, but it will not be as hot as normal. In fact, heat pumps produce a lower temperature heat than traditional heaters. So the air may feel cooler during heating than you are use to anyway. This is normal and is not a sign of a problem.

So what do you do: Set your thermostat to the temperature you want and set the controls for HEAT/COOL and FAN-AUTO/ON and leave the EMERG HEAT off unless your heat pump breaks.

As always, keep your filters clean and your outdoor unit's coils clean and free of debris.

Hope this explains your question for you!

Oct 16, 2009 | Ruud Central System Air Conditioner

2 Answers

Frigidair HVAC not cooling; Believe its a emergency heat problem


the switch is on your thermostat - look for something that says "system" or "Em heat, heat, off, cool" switch it to "cool" and enjoy. If that doesn't work, call a HVAC service tech. You could have bigger problems than just the system switch. Good luck

Sep 05, 2009 | Frigidaire FAS185N2 Air Conditioner

2 Answers

My Honeywell thermostat T874R is showing the EM heat indicator light when I turned the AC on for the first time this season--Why? House is warm but not humid.


The T874R thermostat should be a heat pump thermostat. EM means emergency heat which you obviously are not using. That means that you just need to determine if your heat strip is on while you air conditioner is working. If so you may need to replace your thermostat or you heating relay or sequencer.

May 27, 2008 | Honeywell Heating & Cooling

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