Question about Yamaha 2500 Watt Industrial Inverter Generator YG2800i

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Yamaha ef 2800 i generator no spark.Eliminated all control systems (disconected) checked coil showing 0.2 ohm across pos to neg terminal and 12.4 ohm from either pos or neg to the plug wire.any other ideas to look at?maybe pick up? checked for magnetism at flywheel point for inductor.seem magnetic enough.how would i check the pick up with a multi-meter.? using several different spark plugs incl. a new one of the proper type for the engine.Am spinning the engine by hand with recoil removed

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  • Anonymous Mar 13, 2014

    I need the magnetic pick up for the flywheel, ignitor coil, for a Powercraft PC1050. I am having great difficulty trying to source one of these.

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Check the low oil sending unit.(Make SURE there is enough oil in the unit) Take the 2 wires off and join together. If the unit starts, then replace the sending unit and put the 2 wires back on. good luck

Posted on Sep 21, 2010

  • Anonymous Sep 21, 2010

    By saying: "eliminated all control systems" meant that I bypassed the low oil shutdown thus taking it out of the equation of possibilities that might be causing my problem.

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Tem my briggs portable generator has no spark it appears ignition coil has failed. Items checked. disconnected kill wire to coil, disconnected oil sensor wire no spark this will be the 2nd coil


Test the coil electrically
A digital multimeter is required for testing the resistance levels of the ignition coil. The terminals of the coil are going to be marked "negative" and "positive," and these are the two points where the resistance of primary winding can be measured. Step 1: Prepare the multimeter
To check a 12 volt coil, set the multimeter to at least a 200 Ohms setting. Attach both leads of the meter to the coil-terminals with black to the negative terminal and red to the positive one.
Step 2: Test the resistance
The normal, acceptable range for a standard 12-volt car is 1.5 to 1.7 Ohms. See if the reading is within this range.
Step 3: Test the secondary coil resistance
Set the meter to 20K Ohm setting, and attach the leads to the ignition coil's center terminal. The reading for secondary-coil resistance should be 11, because if it is lower

Oct 26, 2016 | Briggs Electrical Supplies

1 Answer

Gauge showing low output alt only 1yr old wondering if it could be regulator or batt or wiring


if you have access to a digital multimeter, connect the meter (set to volts) across positive and neg. terminal of the battery, should read roughly 12.6 volts, close to 10 volts, battery may be going out, also test the alt output, disconnect neg term and place negative lead to battery neg post and positive lead to neg battery cable (make sure meter is set to amps) should read near the rating, if both those, then you'd want to do a resistance test, (set meter to Ohms) disconnect battery and connect meter neg to either pos cable terminal or where the pos cable connects to the alt and connect positive lead to opposite of neg, should read next to 0, the check resistance of the ground by connecting meter between batt neg cable and body of alt.

- Spenser

Apr 04, 2011 | 1988 Ford F 250

1 Answer

My 92 dakota is not getting any spark


Engine Fails To Start

The "Checking For Spark'' test should be performed prior to this test.

This is a basic test of the ignition system that systematically examines the battery, the coil, the engine controller, and its wiring harness and connections; the most likely culprits in a no-start condition at this stage.
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Fabricate this special jumper with a 0.33 MF capacitor in-line to test the ignition coil
Click to Enlarge

  1. Unplug the ignition coil harness connector at the coil.
  2. Connect a set of small jumper wires (18 gauge or smaller) between the disconnected harness terminals and the ignition coil terminals.
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Terminal locations on the engine controller 14-way connector-1989 models
Click to Enlarge 88472305.gif

Engine controller 60-way connector-relevant terminals for testing are shown numbered
Click to Enlarge

  1. Attach one lead of a a voltmeter to the positive (12V) jumper wire. Attach the negative side of the voltmeter to a good ground. Measure the voltage at the battery and confirm that enough current is available to operate the starting and ignition systems.
  2. Crank the engine for five seconds while monitoring the voltage at the coil positive terminal:
    1. If the voltage remains at zero, diagnosis of the fuel system should be performed. Also check the engine controller and auto shutdown relay.
    2. If voltage is at or near battery voltage and then drops to zero after one or two seconds of engine cranking, check the engine control module circuit.

WARNING

The ignition must be turned OFF prior to unplugging the engine controller connector. If it is not, electrical surging could occur causing damage to the unit or other electrical components in the vehicle.

  1. If the voltage remains at or near battery voltage during the entire five seconds, turn the ignition key OFF. Remove the 14-way connector on 1989 models, or the 60-way connector on 1990-96 models at the engine controller. Check the 14-way or 60-way connector for any spread terminals.
  1. Remove the test lead from the coil positive terminal. Connect an 18 gauge jumper wire between the battery positive terminal and the coil positive terminal.
  2. Make a special jumper cable (see illustration). Using the jumper MOMENTARILY ground terminal 12 on the 14-way connector (1989), or terminal 19 (see illustration) of the 1990-96 60-way connector. A spark should be generated at the coil wire when the ground is removed.
    1. If a spark is generated, replace the engine controller computer.
    2. If no spark is seen, use the special jumper to ground the coil negative terminal directly. If spark is produced, repair the wiring harness for an open circuit condition. If spark is not produced, replace the ignition coil
    this is for distributor ignition
THIS IS TESTING OF DISTRIBUTORLESS IGN
Testing

This procedure requires an ohmmeter to test the coil packs for primary and secondary resistance (specifications are given for an ambient temperature of 70-80°F/21-27°C).
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The two coil packs contain five independent coils, which fire paired cylinders (shown numbered)
Click to Enlarge

  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Determine the manufacturer of the coil. It should be labeled either a Diamond or Toyodenso.
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Location of critical terminals for checking the coil primary resistance-V10 engine front coils
Click to Enlarge 88472780.gif

Location of critical terminals for checking the coil primary resistance-V10 engine rear coils
Click to Enlarge

  1. Check the secondary resistance of each individual paired coil by connecting an ohmmeter across the coil towers. This must be done between the correct cylinder pairs: 3/2, 7/4, 1/6, 9/8, or 5/10. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 11,300-15,300 ohms. For a Toyodenso manufactured coil pack, resistance should be 11,300-13,300 ohms.
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Use an ohmmeter to check secondary resistance as shown

  1. Check the primary resistance of the front coil pack by attaching an ohmmeter between the B+ coil terminal and either the right (cylinders 3/2), center (cylinder 7/4), or left coil (cylinders 1/6) terminals. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 0.97-1.18 ohms. Resistance for a Toyodenso coil should be 0.95-1.20 ohms.
  2. To test the primary resistance of the rear coil pack, attach an ohmmeter between the B+ coil terminal (see illustration) and either the right (cylinders 9/8), or left (cylinders 5/10) coil terminals. Resistance for a Diamond coil should be 0.97-1.18 ohms. Resistance for a Toyodenso coil should be 0.95-1.20 ohms.
i hope this helps any more questions repl if help at all plz vote or comment me

Jan 17, 2011 | 1995 Dodge Dakota

1 Answer

How do i check the coil


check for power to the coil, the connect a spark plug to the end of coil wire, touch end to ground, then remove and connect the ground on the coil, there should be a spark. the second way to check is to use a ohm meter, go across the pos and neg poles, it should read a short if it reads open, then replace

Dec 26, 2010 | Suzuki Sidekick Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Got fuel to the throttle body but still wont fire,


There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That does sound like a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.
The same principal applies to HEI (High Energy Ignition) ignition systems with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap.

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Sep 21, 2010 | 1988 Chevrolet K1500

3 Answers

No spark from spark plug wires I think it may be the distributor cap or interior parts under cap like rotor and condensor but dont want to change parts thats are fine i replaced the plugs but still no...


There wrere two types of HEI (High Energy Ignition) distributors used by GM in 1985, one was the original design with the ignition coil mounted in the top of the distributor cap, and the second had the coil mounted seperate from the distributor and used a coil wire.

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is even getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also if the coil is seperate from the distributor that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require any further assistance.


GM HEI Ignition Coil (Mounted In Distributor Cap Type)
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Jul 30, 2010 | 1985 Chevrolet Chevy

1 Answer

What would cause my car to not send spark to the spark plugs


The first thing is do you know when the last time was that the distributor cap, ignition rotor, and spark plug wires were changed?

There is the possibility that the ignition coil is faulty and first check to see if full battery voltage is getting to the "Pos" (+) positive side of the ignition coil when the key is in the "Run" position, and also that full battery voltage is getting through the "Pos" (+) or positive side of the ignition coil and over to the distributor ignition module, dis-connect the wire connector from the ignition module and if battery voltage is not present at the connector to the ignition module with the key in the "Run" position but it is present at the "Pos" side of the ignition coil, then the ignition coil is faulty. If battery voltage is present then check the ohms between the high tension terminal (where the coil wire goes on the ignition coil) and the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil by first dis-connecting the wires from the ignition coil and then test with the "Neg" lead from the ohm meter in the high tension terminal on the ignition coil, and the "Pos" lead from the ohm meter to the the "Pos" terminal on the ignition coil, and the ohm reading should be between 6,000 and 30,000 ohms and if not replace the ignition coil. A faulty ignition coil can also damage the ignition module.

The ignition module and the pick-up coil/stator located inside of the distributor is what generates the signal that the ECM (Engine Control Module) uses to time and fire the fuel injectors, as well as the signal to run the fuel pump and the dwell signal timing to fire the ignition coil, and a faulty ignition module can cause any one of these systems to malfunction.

That could be a malfunction with the ignition module inside of the distributor, and you can remove the ignition module and have it tested for free at most auto part stores. If the ignition module does test out alright then the problem could still be in the pick-up coil/stator, (it can be tested using an ohm meter by dis-connecting the wire connector from the pick-up coil/stator and the ohm reading between the two wires from the pick-up coil/stator should be between 500 and 1500 ohm's, and both of the wires from the pick-up coil/stator should show an open loop or an infinite reading between each wire and ground) and if the pick-up coil/stator is found to be faulty then replace the entire distributor, or the distributor will have to be dis-assembled to install a new pick-up coil/stator.

If you do purchase a new ignition module be sure that it does come with a silicone grease or a die-electric compound because it is a heat sink and the ignition module will burn up without it.

To install the new ignition module first clean out the mounting surface inside of the distributor. Then completely coat the metal contact surface under the ignition module with a thick coat the silicone grease or die-electric compound and do not leave any of the metal contact surface of the ignition module un-coated with the silicone grease or die-electric compound, and be very careful not to over-tighten the ignition module or it will be damaged.

Let me know if you require a firing order diagram any further assistance with testing or diagnostic procedures.




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Jul 29, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

2 Answers

Just finished 12 volt conversion on 49 V8 flathead. Starter engages but engine won't start. Appears to be getting fuel.


You might not have spark as the 12 volts needs a ballast resistor or the points burn out preytty quick. 8 volts at the coil in run with the points open and 0 with the points clsed and battery voltage at the coil when cranking. coil wire near the intake manifold while cranking should jump at least 2 inches. Closed points should be 0 volts at the neg on the coil. pos and neg should be the same 12 volts with the points open. if not either the coil or the points are bad. The condenser can fail and no spark with all the rest right

Oct 12, 2009 | 1991 Plymouth Colt

2 Answers

Dual voice coil wiring to class d amp


The easiest way to think of wiring voice coils and subs is this:
  • Two items of the same impedance in parallel = Half of the impedance
    • 4 ohms in parallel with 4 ohms = 2 ohms
    • 8 ohms in parallel with 8 ohms = 4 ohms
  • Two items of the same impedance in series = Double the impedance
    • 4 ohms in series with 4 ohms = 8 ohms
    • 8 ohms in series with 8 ohms = 16 ohms
In this case, you want to wire two subs, each with dual 4 ohms voice coils, so that the total equals 2 ohms. Your options are:
  • DVCs in parallel, 2 subs in series = 4 ohms
  • DVCs in series, 2 subs in parallel = 4 ohms
  • DVCs in parallel, 1 sub = 2 ohms
With two, dual 4 ohm subs, you can only have 1 ohm or 4 ohm total impedance.

Mar 16, 2008 | Car Audio & Video

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